John G Clark Memorial Cross, NV

John G Clark Memorial Cross, NV

Clark Memorial Cross – Overton, NV

N 36° 25.523 W 114° 28.143
11S E 726899 N 4034108
Quick Description: This Memorial is located on the south side of State Road 169 in the Valley of Fire State Park in Overton, Nevada, USA.
Location: Nevada, United States
Date Posted: 4/9/2008 7:04:13 PM
Waymark Code: WM3J03

John G Clark Memorial Cross, NV

This Memorials was erected as a monument honoring John G. Clark, a pioneer traveler. This Memorial was erected June 1949 by the citizens of Overton, Nevada. It is about 150 feet off the road, on state route #169. According to information at the Valley of Fire State Park, Captain John J. Clark, retired, 46 New York Infantry, died June 1915, age 67. he was driving a buckboard through the desert on the Arrowhead Trail (early trail to the Muddy). He stopped, tied his horse to the back of the buckboard, laid down and died of thirst at that point in the Valley of Fire.”

John G Clark Memorial Cross, NV

To facilitate visiting the monument, there is a turnout on the south side of State Road 169 that can accommodate several cars.

From the Valley of Fire State Park website: “Valley of Fire State Park is located only six miles from Lake Mead and 55 miles northeast of Las Vegas via Interstate 15 and on exit 75. Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest state park, dedicated 1935. The valley derives its name from the red sandstone formations and the stark beauty of the Mojave Desert. Ancient trees and early man are represented throughout the park by areas of petrified wood and 3,000 year-old Indian petroglyph. Popular activities include camping, hiking, picnicking and photography. The park offers a full-scale visitor center with extensive interpretive displays. Several group use areas are also available. The park is open all year.”

Bodie Ghost Town State Historic Park, CA

Bodie State Historic Park, CA Map
More than 170 buildings are protected in a state of “arrested decay” on more than 1,000 remote acres, administered by the California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Seasons / Hours
Bodie State Historic Park is open year round. It opens at 8am everyday but closing time changes seasonally (mid summer closing is at 7pm, mid-winter at 4pm).
Winter Visits
Bodie is open all year. However, because of the high elevation (8375 feet), it is accessible only by over-snow equipment during the winter months.
Many four wheel drive vehicles get stuck each year in powdery snow that is deeper than it first appears. Spring thaws bring mud, and wheeled vehicles are not advised. TOWING FACILITIES ARE NOT AVAILABLE. Snowmobiles must stay on designated roads within the park.
Winter weather is often unpredictable. Sub-zero temperatures, strong winds and white-out conditions are not uncommon. Call 760-647-6445 for current conditions
Rates & Fees
$5.00 per person – $3.00 per child (No Credit Cards) – pets must be leashed.
Facilities
There are no services, camping, lodging, food vending or stores. There is one bathroom one museum open during the summer where books on Bodie and a few other items are available for sale. Restrooms (flush toilets) are located at the parking lot.
Bodie Ghost Town State Historic Park, CA
Climate
At an elevation of 8,400 feet, it’s hot during the summer, and potentially very cold during the winter. The weather can be changeable and layered clothing is recommended.
Location – Directions
The park is northeast of Yosemite, 13 miles east of Highway 395 on Bodie Road, seven miles south of Bridgeport.
Latitude/Longitude: 38.2122 / -119.0111

From U.S. 395 seven miles south of Bridgeport, take State Route 270. Go east 10 miles to the end of the pavement and continue 3 miles on an unsurfaced road to Bodie. The last 3 miles can at times be rough. Reduced speeds are necessary. Call the park if there are any questions about road conditions.
History
The town of Bodie rose to prominence with the decline of mining along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. Prospectors crossing the eastern slope in 1859 to search for gold, discovered what was to be the Comstock Lode at Virginia City and started a wild rush to the surrounding high desert country.
By 1879, Bodie boasted a population of about 10,000 and was second to none for wickedness, badmen, and “the worst climate out of doors.” One little girl, whose family was taking her to the remote and infamous town, wrote in her diary: “Goodbye God, I’m going to Bodie.” This phrase came to be known throughout the west.
Killings occurred with monotonous regularity here in Bodie, sometimes becoming almost daily events. The fire bell, which tolled the ages of the deceased when they were buried, rang often and long. Robberies, stage holdups and street fights provided variety, and the town’s 65 saloons offered many opportunities for relaxation after hard days of work in the mines. The Reverend F.M. Warrington saw it in 1881 as “a sea of sin, lashed by the tempests of lust and passion.”
Nearly everyone has heard about the infamous “Badman from Bodie.” Some historians say that he was a real person by the name of Tom Adams. Others say his name was Washoe Pete. It seems more likely, however, that he was a composite. Bad men, like bad whiskey and bad climate, were endemic to the area.
Whatever the case, the streets are quiet now. Bodie still has its wicked climate, but with the possible exception of an occasional ghostly visitor, its badmen are all in their graves. Only about five percent of the buildings it contained during its 1880 heyday still remain. Today, it stands just as time, fire and the elements have left it — a genuine California gold-mining ghost town. Designated a state historic park in 1962, it is now maintained in a state of “arrested decay.”
Bodie was named after Waterman S. Body (also known as William S. Bodey), who discovered gold here in 1859. The change in spelling of the town’s name has often been attributed to an illiterate sign painter, but it was really a deliberate change by the citizenry to ensure proper pronunciation.
You can see the Standard Mine and Mill on the west slope of Bodie Bluff. Because the old mill buildings and surrounding area are extremely unsafe, they are closed to the public. The mine was known as the Bunker Hill Mine when it was registered in July 1861. It passed through several hands before being sold for $67,500 to four partners, who changed the name and incorporated as the Standard Company in April 1877.
The Standard Mine yielded nearly $15 million over 25 years, and its success caused the 1878 rush to Bodie. In only a year, the population rose from about 20 to an estimated 10,000 miners, gamblers and other entrepreneurs. The Mill was destroyed by fire in 1898, but was rebuilt the following year. While the boom lasted, some 30 companies produced $400,000 in bullion per month for an overall total estimated at $90 to $100 million.
Published in: on March 12, 2010 at 2:23 PM  Comments Off on Bodie Ghost Town State Historic Park, CA  
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Cooking with Cattail

Cattail
Cooking with Cattail Shoots

In early spring, cattails send up small, immature shoots that are rich and succulent and taste a bit like zucchini. These first sprigs of fresh cattail can be put into stir-fries, soups, pasta sauces, or any other recipe that calls for fresh, green vegetables. My favorite preferred use is in Asian-style stir fries. Their taste especially complements the texture and flavor of water chestnuts.

Cooking with Cattail Hearts

When cattail shoots mature in mid spring, the rich “heart” at the base of the leaf-blades becomes full of nutrients. These can be used in the same contexts as cattail shoots, but will lend a slightly stronger flavor and crunchier texture. A cattail heart’s texture is something like a cross between a bamboo shoot and an artichoke heart, and its flavor is like a cross between a rutabaga and a melon rind. They are ideal for pickling and canning.

Cooking with Cattail Heads

One of my all-time favorite foods is what I call “cat on the cob”, a delightful dish that tastes remarkably similar to sweet, white corn. Immature cattail heads that do not yet have a cotton-like texture– best harvested in early summer— are tasty and wonderful additions to any meal. They can be boiled or put into soups and stir-fries, but I prefer to cook them in a buttered skillet over medium heat and serve them in place of corn.


Cooking with Cattail Pollen

When the flowers, or heads, of the cattail plant mature in mid-summer, their pollen can be gathered and used in the same context as corn starch. The pollen gives an excellent flavor to breads and pancakes when it is added to flours, or it can be used as a thickener in gravies, soups, and
stews. Its flavor is mild and barely noticeable, but it makes a fine addition to the pantry of any foraging chef.

Cooking with Cattail Roots
The cream of the cattail crop is its rhizome, or root, which can be harvested any time between late fall and early spring. Cattails store starches in their roots over winter, similarly to potatoes and carrots, and provide a succulant, fibrous meal base when the root is properly harvested. These rhizomes can be prepared like potatoes or used along with them. Cattail roots make a great addition to mashed potatoes, greens, and root-bakes.
Regardless of the route you choose for cooking cattails, be sure that you have properly identified the plant. While there are few poisonous plants that resemble the cattail at any stage of life, it is still critical that all foragers cook wild plants only if they are certain that it has been accurately identified.
When the flowers, or heads, of the cattail plant mature in mid-summer, their pollen can be gathered and used in the same context as corn starch. The pollen gives an excellent flavor to breads and pancakes when it is added to flours, or it can be used as a thickener in gravies, soups, and
stews. Its flavor is mild and barely noticeable, but it makes a fine addition to the pantry of any foraging chef.


Valley of Fire -The Cabins, NV

The Cabins

The historic stone cabins built with native sandstone by the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) in the 1930’s as a shelter for passing travelers.

Park Brochure

The Cabins

The Cabins – Anasazi Petroglyph’s

The Cabins - Anasazi Petroglyph's

The petroglyph’s depicted here can be located upon the rock wall directly behind the cabins, once entering the park the directions to these formations are provided within the park informational pamphlet provided at the entrance gate.

Elephant Rock & Poodle Rock, Valley of Fire Nevada

Elephant Rock, Valley of Fire, NV

During the last Ice Age, which ended 10,000 years ago, this area was much cooler and wetter, providing habitat for many animals that are now extinct, including saber-tooth cats, giant ground sloths, prehistoric horses and camels, and giant mammoths. The only relic of that time are the massive rock formations that are scattered throughout the park two notable formations are Elephant Rock  and Poodle Rock is a testament to the many varied stone shapes at Valley of Fire, thanks to the wonders of geology and the erosive power of weather.

Park Brochure

Poodle Rock, Valley of Fire, NV

Once entering the park the directions to these formations are provided within the park informational pamphlet provided at the entrance gate.

Published in: on February 22, 2010 at 2:51 PM  Comments Off on Elephant Rock & Poodle Rock, Valley of Fire Nevada  
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Fire Cave, sometimes referred to as Windstone Arch

Fire Cave, sometimes referred to as Windstone Arch, can be found in Valley of Fire State Park, about 1 hour from Las Vegas, Nevada

Wind Stone Arch

The “Wind Stone Arch” (which incidentally is not an official name, in reality, this miniature arch has no name) located on the gravel loop at Campground, are also at the Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock.

Map

The coordinates (WGS 84) of the “Wind Stone Arch” are:

In degrees – minutes – seconds:
N 36 ° 24’45 .00 ”
W 114 ° 33’14 .34 ”

The arch is locate in a mini wind tunnel formed out of Sandstone rock.   the coordinates will take you to a standalone rock formation start looking inside the cavity of the rock where the wind and erosion has removed the rock base

Published in: on February 22, 2010 at 2:26 PM  Comments Off on Fire Cave, sometimes referred to as Windstone Arch  
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Anasazi State Park Museum, UT

 

Anasazi State Park Museum, UT

Anasazi State Park Museum, UT

 

 

This ancient village in the heart of Utah’s canyon country was one of the largest Ancestral Puebloan communities west of the Colorado River. Now called the Coombs Site, it is believed to have been occupied from AD 1160 to 1235 and may have housed as many as 200 people. Archeological excavations at the site have revealed more than 100 structures and have produced thousands of artifacts, some of which are on display in the museum. In addition to museum collections, visitors may also explore the Coombs Site, located directly behind the museum.
Anasazi State Park Museum offers a museum store, auditorium, and outdoor picnic areas. There are no overnight facilities available at the museum, but camping and lodging facilities are located nearby.
Hours: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Summer / 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Winter
Holiday Closures: Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day
Day Visits: $4 per person/$75 annual pass
Location: Anasazi State Park Museum is located 22 miles northeast of Escalante on Highway 12 in Boulder, Utah.
This ancient village in the heart of Utah’s canyon country was one of the largest Ancestral Puebloan communities west of the Colorado River. Now called the Coombs Site, it is believed to have been occupied from AD 1160 to 1235 and may have housed as many as 200 people. Archeological excavations at the site have revealed more than 100 structures and have produced thousands of artifacts, some of which are on display in the museum. In addition to museum collections, visitors may also explore the Coombs Site, located directly behind the museum.
Anasazi State Park Museum, UT

Anasazi State Park Museum, UT

Anasazi State Park Museum offers a museum store, auditorium, and outdoor picnic areas. There are no overnight facilities available at the museum, but camping and lodging facilities are located nearby.
Hours: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Summer / 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Winter
Holiday Closures: Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day
Day Visits: $4 per person/$75 annual pass
Location: Anasazi State Park Museum is located 22 miles northeast of Escalante on Highway 12 in Boulder, Utah.
Anasazi State Park Museum, UT

Anasazi State Park Museum, UT

Anasazi State Park Museum
460 North Highway 12
Boulder, UT 84716
(435) 335-7308
parkcomment@utah.gov
Published in: on May 18, 2009 at 12:59 PM  Comments Off on Anasazi State Park Museum, UT  
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The Valley of Fire State Park, NV

The Valley of Fire State Park, NV - Wedding Arch

The Valley of Fire State Park, NV - Wedding Arch

Prehistory:

The Valley of Fire derives its name from red sandstone formations, formed from great shifting sand dunes during the age of dinosaurs, 150 million years ago. Complex uplifting and faulting of the region, followed by extensive erosion, have created the present landscape. Other important rock formations include limestones, shales, and conglomerates. Prehistoric users of the Valley of Fire included the Basket Maker people and later the Anasazi Pueblo farmers from the nearby fertile Moapa Valley. The span of approximate occupation has been dated from 300 B.C. to 1150 A.D. Their visits probably involved hunting, food gathering, and religious ceremonies, although scarcity of water would have limited the length of their stay. Fine examples of rock art left by these ancient peoples can be found at several sites within the park.

Climate

main entrance gate with snowcapped mountains in the backgroundWinters are mild with temperatures ranging from freezing to 75 degrees. Daily summer highs usually exceed 100 degrees, and may reach 120 degrees. Summer temperatures can vary widely from day to night. Average annual rainfall is four inches, coming in the form of light winter showers and summer thunderstorms. Spring and fall are the preferred seasons for visiting the Valley of Fire. Snow rarely falls at Valley of Fire as shown in this picture.

Nature

The area plant community is dominated by widely spaced creosote bush, burro bush, and brittle bush. Several cactus species, including beaver tail and cholla, are also common. The springtime bloom of such plants as the desert marigold, indigo bush, and desert mallow are often spectacular along park roads. Resident birds include the raven, house finch, sage sparrow, and roadrunner. a coyote Many migrant birds also pass through the park. Most desert animals are nocturnal and not frequently seen by the passing motorist. Many species of lizards and snakes are common in the park, as well as the coyote, kit fox, spotted skunk, black tailed jack rabbit, and antelope ground squirrel. The desert tortoise is a rare species and is protected by state law. If you are lucky enough to come across one please leave this likable and harmless creature to live its life in peace in its own environment.

Facilities

Entrance Fee: An entrance fee is charged to enter the park, with additional fee for camping. Current fees are posted at the park entrance. Click here for all individual park fees by region.

Visitor Information: The visitor center provides exhibits on the geology, ecology, prehistory, and history of the park and the nearby region. It is strongly recommended that each visitor make this an early stop after entering the park. Postcards, books, and film are on sale for your convenience. Open daily, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Camping: Additional fees are charged for the use of these areas and is payable at the campgrounds. All campsites are first come, first serve. There are two campgrounds with a combined total of 73 units. Campsites are equipped with shaded tables, grills, water, and restrooms. An additional fee is charged for the use of the area and is payable at the campground. A dump station and showers are available..

RV Camping: RV sites with power and water hookup are now available. A $10 surcharge is added to the regular camping fee for the use of these sites.

Picnicking: Shaded areas with restrooms are located at Atlatl Rock, Seven Sisters, the Cabins, near Mouse’s Tank trail head and White Domes.

Group Area:
There are three group areas, each accommodating up to 45 persons. They are available for overnight camping and picnicking by reservation only. Advance reservations are required. For information call Valley of Fire State Park (702) 397-2088.

Hiking: Many intriguing hikes are available to visitors. Inquire at the visitor center for suggestions on day hikes of varying length and terrain.

Sites of interest:

Atlatl Rock: Outstanding examples of ancient Indian rock art or petroglyphs, including a depiction of the atlatl (at’-lat-l), a notched stick used to throw primitive spears. The atlatl was a predecessor to the bow and arrow. The adjacent Atlatl Rock Campground provides a modern restroom and shower building.

Arch Rock: Near Atlatl Rock Campground is the more primitive Arch Rock Campground with its more secluded campsites. A two-mile scenic loop road provides views of some of the Valley’s most interesting rock formations, such as Arch Rock and Piano Rock.

Enterprise rock formation beehives rock formation Beehives:
Unusual sandstone formations weathered by the eroding forces of wind and water. Nearby are three group camping areas, available by reservation only.

Cabins: Now a picnic area, these historic stone cabins were built with native sandstone by the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) in the 1930’s as a shelter for passing travelers.

Clark Memorial: Historic monument honors a pioneer traveler.

Elephant Rock Formation

Elephant Rock Formation

elephant rock formation
Elephant Rock is accessible via a short trail.

Fire Canyon/Silica Dome: From this vantage point there is an excellent view of the deep red sandstone of Fire Canyon, and the unique geological features of Silica Dome.

Mouse’s Tank: Named for a renegade Indian who used the area as a hideout in the 1890’s. Mouse’s Tank is a natural basin in the rock where water collects after rainfalls, sometimes remaining for months. A half-mile round trip trail leads to Mouse’s Tank from the trail head parking area, passing numerous examples of prehistoric Indian petroglyphs.

Petrified Logs: Logs and stumps washed into the area from an ancient forest about 225 million years ago are exposed in two locations.

rainbow Seven Sisters Rock FormationRainbow Vista: A favorite photo point with a panoramic view of multicolored sandstone.

Seven Sisters: Fascinating red rock formations are easily accessible from the road. Picnic areas provide a relaxing stop during your Valley tour.
White Domes: Sandstone formations with brilliant contrasting colors; picnic area and trail head. White Domes is an eleven-mile (17.7 km) round trip drive from the Visitor Center. Duck Rock is a short hike away.

Published in: on February 27, 2009 at 9:21 PM  Comments Off on The Valley of Fire State Park, NV  
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Antelope Island State Park, UT

Antelope Island State Park, UT

Antelope Island State Park, UT

Island, with an area of 42 square miles (68 km²), is the largest island in the Great Salt Lake, the largest lake in the Western United States.The island lies entirely within Davis County, in the southeastern portion of the lake and becomes a peninsula when the lake is at extremely low levels. Antelope Island holds populations of pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep, 800 American Bison and millions of waterfowl. The Bison were introduced to the island in 1893, and have proven to be a valuable genetic pool for Bison breeding and conservation purposes.

Antelope Island State Park, UT

Antelope Island State Park, UT

Antelope Island State Park is a state park located on the northern portion of the island, established in 1981, part of the Utah State Parks System. The island is accessible via a 7 mile (11 km) causeway from West Point in Davis County. Access from I-15 is via Exit 332, Syracuse/Antelope Drive. The island’s shore is mostly (all but west side of the island), relatively flat with beaches and plains to the base of the mountains on the island. These steep mountains are visible from most of the northern Wasatch Front, reaching a maximum elevation of 6,596 ft (2,010 m), which is about 2,500 feet above the level of the lake.

Antelope Island State Park, UT

Antelope Island State Park, UT

Published in: on February 12, 2009 at 4:35 PM  Comments Off on Antelope Island State Park, UT  
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Gunlock State Park – Petroglyphs, UT

Gunlock State Park - Petroglyphs

Gunlock State Park - Petroglyphs

Gunlock Reservoir (240 acres) is situated among small hills and moderate vegetation. Gunlock State Park on its southern shore has a boat ramp and a primitive campground with vault toilets. The reservoir yields bass and crappie. It is located 21 miles northwest of St. George just south of the town of Gunlock.

The name Gunlock is the same as the small farming community one mile to the north. William Haynes Hamblin (nicknamed Will or Bill), a Mormon pioneer born in Ohio, settled in the present area of the lake in 1857. Gunlock Will was a good hunter and sharpshooter, and was skillful in repairing gunlocks, which are the firing mechanisms for muzzleloaders.

Gunlock State Park - Petroglyphs

Gunlock State Park - Petroglyphs

His brother, Jacob Hamblin, was actually the more well known of the two. He was a Mormon settler and a missionary to the Indians of southern Utah and northern Arizona, particularly the Shivwits tribe of the Paiute Indians, who still live in this area.

The county road to the park is the Old Spanish Trail used by horsemen and raiders from Sante Fe, New Mexico to Los Angeles from the 1820 s until the gold fields became the destination after 1849 and a shorter route was taken.

A sparkling blue lake is rimmed with ponderosa pines, and a string of campgrounds follows the beginnings of the river to road?s end.

Gunlock State Park - Petroglyphs

Gunlock State Park - Petroglyphs

Gunlock Reservoir dam was constructed in 1970 for irrigation water and flood control.

Published in: on January 16, 2009 at 6:16 PM  Comments Off on Gunlock State Park – Petroglyphs, UT  
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