Cave Valley, UT

Ghost Rock

Feature Name: Cave Valley
County: Washington County
Latitude: 37.32637
Longitude: -113.1091119

Feature Name: Cave ValleyCategory: Utah physical, cultural and historic featuresFeature Type: PhysicalClass: ValleyCounty: Washington CountyLatitude: 37.32637Longitude: -113.1091119

Cave Valley, UT

Cave Valley Pictographs – These are some of the best in Zion and are found along the Kolob Terrace Road. Again this rock art is protected and are settled among federal and private property lines ask at the Zion Canyon Visitor Center for directions.

Entrance to Large Cave

Cave Canyon in the Kolob Terrace is a remote site with nice rock art. There are also the well-known and protected Parunuweap ruins, but again, a park ranger needs to be contacted for more information and most of the sites are off limits to all but research personnel.

Calico Mine & Ghost Town, CA

Calico Mine & Ghost Town

Calico is a ghost town located in the Mojave Desert region of Southern California. Founded in 1881 as a silver mining town, today it is a county park. It is located in unincorporated San Bernardino County off Interstate 15, 3 miles from Barstow.

Calico Mine & Ghost Town

At its height, shortly after it was founded, Calico had a population of 1,200 people and over 500 silver mines. Besides the usual assortment of bars, brothels, gambling halls and a few churches, Calico also supported a newspaper, the Calico Print. In the mid 1890s the price of silver dropped and Calico’s silver mines were no longer economically viable. With the end of borax mining in the region in 1907 the town was completely abandoned. The last original inhabitant of Calico before it was abandoned, Mrs. Lucy Bell Lane, died in the 1960s. Her house remains as the main museum in town.
In 1951, Walter Knott, founder of Knott’s Berry Farm, purchased the town and began restoring it to its original condition referencing old photographs. In the late 1950s, a western garbed man with Custer whiskers known as Calico Fred was a local fixture.  Though five of the original town buildings exist today, many others were recreated as replicas of their originals on preexisting foundations. In 1966, Knott donated the town to San Bernardino County, and Calico became a county regional park.
Today, the park operates mine tours, gunfight stunt shows, gold panning, a restaurant, the Calico & Odessa Railroad and a number of general merchandise stores. It is open daily, and requires an entrance fee. Calico is a registered California historic monument and the “official state silver rush ghost town” of California.

Buckhorn Wash Pictograph Panel

Buckhorn Wash Pictograph Panel

The San Rafael River is the boundary-Buckhorn Wash north of the River, Cottonwood Wash to the south. The southern section, Cottonwood Wash, is a wide-open rolling high desert, with low rocky bluffs studded with distant towering buttes. This road is well maintained and is generally a safe road to drive. The Buckhorn Wash portion of this route is especially scenic, with canyon walls rising many hundreds of feet above you, Native American rock art panels, a well-preserved dinosaur track and more! There are many side roads along this route, but the navigation of this road is easy-when in doubt, stay on the main road!

Believed to be the work of the BARRIER CANYON CULTURE, the Buckhorn Wash panel is more than 2,000 years old. It predates the Fremont work found in Castle Country. The Barrier Canyon people did not have pottery. They hunted and gathered, used stone and bone tools and atlatls (spear throwers).

Distinctive features of Barrier Canyon
Rock Art

  • life-sized figures without arms or legs
  • broad shoulders, tapered trunks and bug eyes
  • dots, rays and crowns above heads
  • figures accompanied by birds, insects, snakes and dogs

How these Pictographs were made
Pictographs were painted on the surface of rock with natural pigments. Black was made from yellow ochre (a mineral found in the soil), pinyon gum and sumac. When stirred together, they form a black powder. Reds were made from red ochre and the roots of mountain mahogany. Rabbitbrush was a source of yellow. Likely binding agents were plant oils and animal fats. Petroglyphs were carved, pecked or chiseled into the rock.

Buckhorn Wash Pictograph Panel

Likely tools used in making Pictographs and petroglyphs

  • brushes made from human hair, dog hair or yucca fibers
  • flint or other stone chisel and hammers
  • hollow bird bones filled with pigment
  • fingers or mouths- paint could be blown out of the mouth and onto the rock creating a negative image often associated with handprints.

Vandalism
Paint, chalk, carvings and bullet holes have vandalized the Buckhorn Panel. The canyon’s proximity to the Old Spanish Trail and its use as a hideout for outlaws made the pictograph panel a prime target for vandals. Sadly, much of the damage is permanent and lost art cannot be repaired. However, the Buckhorn Panel was greatly improved in 1995 through an intensive restoration effort. Today vandalism of rock art is illegal and should be reported to law enforcement authorities.

The Restoration Project
As part of the 1996 Centennial Celebration citizens of Emery County initiated the restoration of the Buckhorn Panel. This project was a joint effort by citizens, the BLM, Utah and county governments. This site is one of several in the United States that has been restored by Constance Silver, an internationally known art conservator. The clean up took about six weeks at the site.

Please help preserve the panel by:

  • looking with your eyes, not your hands
  • reporting vandals to the BLM or local Sheriff

Follow This Map to locate the panels

Fire Cave, sometimes referred to as Windstone Arch

Fire Cave, sometimes referred to as Windstone Arch, can be found in Valley of Fire State Park, about 1 hour from Las Vegas, Nevada

Wind Stone Arch

The “Wind Stone Arch” (which incidentally is not an official name, in reality, this miniature arch has no name) located on the gravel loop at Campground, are also at the Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock.

Map

The coordinates (WGS 84) of the “Wind Stone Arch” are:

In degrees – minutes – seconds:
N 36 ° 24’45 .00 ”
W 114 ° 33’14 .34 ”

The arch is locate in a mini wind tunnel formed out of Sandstone rock.   the coordinates will take you to a standalone rock formation start looking inside the cavity of the rock where the wind and erosion has removed the rock base

Published in: on February 22, 2010 at 2:26 PM  Comments Off on Fire Cave, sometimes referred to as Windstone Arch  
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Prehistoric Indians 1300 AD

Since quite a bit of the posts on this website are related to prehistoric Indians I have decided to add these images to provide a representation of the culture.

These are images obtained from http://www.joevenusartist.com

http://www.joevenusartist.com/Prehistoric%20Fremont%20Culture.htm

http://www.joevenusartist.com/Prehistoric%20Fremont%20Culture.htmhttp://www.joevenusartist.com/Prehistoric%20Fremont%20Culture.htm


http://www.joevenusartist.com/Prehistoric%20Fremont%20Culture.htm

http://www.joevenusartist.com/Prehistoric%20Fremont%20Culture.htm

http://www.joevenusartist.com/Prehistoric%20Fremont%20Culture.htm

Published in: on January 24, 2010 at 7:08 PM  Comments Off on Prehistoric Indians 1300 AD  
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Pioneer Park, UT

Pioneer Park, UT
Pioneer Park
Red Hills Parkway
St. George, UT
This 52 acre rustic community park is a rock climber’s paradise. From Dixie Rock, also known as the Sugarloaf, spectacular views of downtown, White Dome, Zion National Park and Arizona can be seen. This park has a large trellis pavilion with two barbecues and fire ring, several smaller picnic areas with tables, two with metal trellis pavilions, and a separate fire pit with an amphitheater. Numerous hiking trails provide access to a Boy Scout Cave, historical pioneer cabin location, slot canyons and a connection into the Red Cliffs Desert Reserve.
Pioneer Park, UT
Amenities
• BBQ • Picnic Tables • Covered Pavillion • Walking Path
• Parking • Reservable • Trail
Pioneer Park is tucked into the cliffs just north of downtown St. George, and at this position at it has a stunning panoramic view of the city. It is also a great spot to hike, bike, and picnic. The trails in the park are beautiful as they are surrounded by desert flora and are frequented by wildlife. Of special note, there are many short fences throughout the park that protect desert turtles from traffic on the roads near the park. St. George’s “Dixie” sign is also here.
The park is just off of Skyline Drive which serves as a bypass north of the city from Interstate 15 to SR-18.

Blanding, UT – Anasazi Indian Ruins

Image Pending

Ancient Pueblo People, or Ancestral Puebloans is a preferred term for the cultural group of people often known as Anasazi who are the ancestors of the modern Pueblo peoples. The ancestral Puebloans were a prehistoric Native American civilization centered around the present-day Four Corners area of the Southwest United States.

The civilization is perhaps best-known for the jacal, adobe and sandstone dwellings that they built along cliff walls, particularly during the Pueblo II and Pueblo III eras. An excellent location to appreciate the history of these people can be found at this un-named location of classic ruins

County roads leading to this location is partially gravel and sandstone, this drive may not be a good idea in wet weather.    Although a 4WD is not necessary but opens up many possibilities for further exploration of the area.

 

This un-named location is  littered with old anasazi Indian ruins, cliff dwellings and petroglyphs just about everywhere you look.
The GPS coordinates supplied will find you near an old cliff dwelling and close to a cliff face with lots of writing on it.
Remember: take nothing but pictures!
“Just a reminder that the cliff dwellings, petroglyphs and any
artifacts in the area are federally protected. Tampering with them, or removing any artifacts can net you a hefty fine and jail time”

GPS location: N 37° 32.396 W 109° 14.486

Google Map

Published in: on November 12, 2009 at 4:51 PM  Comments Off on Blanding, UT – Anasazi Indian Ruins  
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South Camp 1800s Mining Ruins, UT

South Camp 1800s Mining Ruins, UT

 

South Camp 1800s Mining Ruins – The remains of these rock cabins are some of the last vestiges of “South Camp”, one of the leading mining camps in the Star Range, which was active in the late 1800s. More than a hundred years ago this was a bustling town. With an active stagecoach line from Milford which led west through South Camp to Nevada. Homes, stores, and saloons once stood here. The mines in the area are are open yet dangerous, although some of them still hold priceless ore for those who are up for the adventure.

South Camp 1800s Mining Ruins, UT

Location For Google Map Click Here

Power Line Road Petroglyphs, NV

Power Line Road:
Take I-15 to Exit 27 (Hwy 146 – St. Rose Parkway), go 1 block east to S. Las Vegas Blvd.  Then turn right on S. Las Vegas Blvd. and go south approximately 2 miles to the power lines.  Or, if you are heading south on Las Vegas Blvd. continue on past the intersection of St. Rose Parkway for approximately 2 miles to the power lines.  If you are using mileage along with GPS coordinates, “zero your mileage” where the Power Line Road meets Las Vegas Blvd.
Turn left (east) under the power lines on the Power Line Road.
The first thing that you will come to is the Magnolia Power Sub Station.  You can go around it either to the left or right side staying on the road next to the sub station fence.  Once around the back side of the sub station you will see where the Power Line Road continues.  Follow the rusted power poles.
At approximately 3.6 miles from Las Vegas Blvd. you will come to the new dirt road crossing the Power Line Road.  Cross this road, continuing on the Power Line Road.
Stay on the Power Line Road, until you come to pole number X12084 (metal tag) – also the number 2068 is spray painted on the same pole.  About 100 feet after the pole, there will be a dirt road going to the right.  Turn right (south) and travel about .5 of a mile and you will drop into a dry wash.
Turn right in the wash.  Staying in the wash, the parking area is approximately .6 of a mile up the wash.  The parking area is as far as you can drive.  There is a sign with information and a sign in box at the parking area.  From here you walk up the wash to the petroglyph area.
The distance from the parking area to the main petroglyph site is approximately 1.1 miles.  Keep alert and you will see a few isolated petroglyphs (on your right) and a couple of nice panels (on your left) along the route to the main site.  At approximately .8 of a mile you will encounter the first of several small dry falls – this one was the location of the original parking area.  The next small rock area (dry fall) is about another .1 of a mile further and both are easily negotiated.
Continue to the last set of dry falls, which marks the beginning of the main site.  The petroglyphs start at the base of the lowest falls and you will see more as you are going up the rocks/falls.  Most people climb up the rocks on the left side of the dry falls (as you are facing up stream).  Once you reach the upper most of the dry falls, climb back down into the wash.  You are now at the main site.  There will be petroglyphs on both sides of the canyon, but most are on the right side as you are going up the wash.
Things that may be helpful:
The hike from the parking area to the main site is approximately 1.1 miles in a dry wash bottom made up of a loose sand and gravel mixture.  There is approximately a 170′ elevation gain from the parking area to the main site.
You will need to do some minor rock scrambling up the last set of dry falls just before the main site.
The main site has petroglyphs at the wash level as well as up on the hill sides.  You can go up on either hillside, sit down and look across to the other side.  A lot of petroglyphs that you did not see before will become visible.  The longer you look the more you will see.
I would highly recommend that you DO NOT take a passenger car to this site.  I would recommend a high-clearance vehicle because there are several places on the Power Line Road that are prone to wash outs.
For up-to-date information on road conditions, please call the Las Vegas BLM office at (702) 515-5000.
Image Pending

Image Pending

Power Line Road:
Take I-15 to Exit 27 (Hwy 146 – St. Rose Parkway), go 1 block east to S. Las Vegas Blvd.  Then turn right on S. Las Vegas Blvd. and go south approximately 2 miles to the power lines.  Or, if you are heading south on Las Vegas Blvd. continue on past the intersection of St. Rose Parkway for approximately 2 miles to the power lines.  If you are using mileage along with GPS coordinates, “zero your mileage” where the Power Line Road meets Las Vegas Blvd.
Turn left (east) under the power lines on the Power Line Road.
The first thing that you will come to is the Magnolia Power Sub Station.  You can go around it either to the left or right side staying on the road next to the sub station fence.  Once around the back side of the sub station you will see where the Power Line Road continues.  Follow the rusted power poles.
At approximately 3.6 miles from Las Vegas Blvd. you will come to the new dirt road crossing the Power Line Road.  Cross this road, continuing on the Power Line Road.
Stay on the Power Line Road, until you come to pole number X12084 (metal tag) – also the number 2068 is spray painted on the same pole.  About 100 feet after the pole, there will be a dirt road going to the right.  Turn right (south) and travel about .5 of a mile and you will drop into a dry wash.
Turn right in the wash.  Staying in the wash, the parking area is approximately .6 of a mile up the wash.  The parking area is as far as you can drive.  There is a sign with information and a sign in box at the parking area.  From here you walk up the wash to the petroglyph area.
The distance from the parking area to the main petroglyph site is approximately 1.1 miles.  Keep alert and you will see a few isolated petroglyphs (on your right) and a couple of nice panels (on your left) along the route to the main site.  At approximately .8 of a mile you will encounter the first of several small dry falls – this one was the location of the original parking area.  The next small rock area (dry fall) is about another .1 of a mile further and both are easily negotiated.
Continue to the last set of dry falls, which marks the beginning of the main site.  The petroglyphs start at the base of the lowest falls and you will see more as you are going up the rocks/falls.  Most people climb up the rocks on the left side of the dry falls (as you are facing up stream).  Once you reach the upper most of the dry falls, climb back down into the wash.  You are now at the main site.  There will be petroglyphs on both sides of the canyon, but most are on the right side as you are going up the wash.
Things that may be helpful:
The hike from the parking area to the main site is approximately 1.1 miles in a dry wash bottom made up of a loose sand and gravel mixture.  There is approximately a 170′ elevation gain from the parking area to the main site.
You will need to do some minor rock scrambling up the last set of dry falls just before the main site.
The main site has petroglyphs at the wash level as well as up on the hill sides.  You can go up on either hillside, sit down and look across to the other side.  A lot of petroglyphs that you did not see before will become visible.  The longer you look the more you will see.
I would highly recommend that you DO NOT take a passenger car to this site.  I would recommend a high-clearance vehicle because there are several places on the Power Line Road that are prone to wash outs.
For up-to-date information on road conditions, please call the Las Vegas BLM office at (702) 515-5000.

Coordinates for the Power Line Road:

Description Lat/Lon NAD 83/84
Las Vegas Blvd & Power Line 35d 56.285′  115d 11.151′
Magnolia Sub Station 35d 55.697′  115d 10.495

Right turn after power pole #2068

35d 55.455′  115d 07.462′
Turn right into the wash 35d 54.966′  115d 07.379′
Parking area 35d 54.541′  115d 07.459′
Last dry falls/main site 35d 53.848′  115d 07.390′

Published in: on October 15, 2009 at 6:01 PM  Comments Off on Power Line Road Petroglyphs, NV  
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Gordon’s Panel, also known as Shaman’s Gallery, AZ

Gordon’s Panel, also known as Shamans’ Gallery, contains the oldest prehistoric evidence of man in the Grand Canyon and is quite possibly the most important rock art panel discovered on the North American continent.

The site was used by Indian shamans to try and communicate with the supernatural for thousands of years. Did they actually see what they painted? The images are multicolored, abstract, and life sized. Underlying these figures are earlier images. Some of the smaller figures in the caves, the oldest paintings, look like neanderthal man paintings. Other paintings look like deer with huge antlers, “space men” with antennas, and objects that look like space craft. The writings here The oldest prehistoric evidence of man in the Grand Canyon and is possibly the most important rock art panel discovered on the North American continent dating back 1400 to 20,000 years.

Despite the importance of and unusual nature of this site, very little research has been done. There have been no excavations near the site to help determine who the artists could have been or how they lived. The age of the site remains estimated, as most of the paintings were done with mineral pigments that cannot be carbon dated. However, it might be possible to test for organic dyes that could be carbon dated, such as Oregon Grape, a dye well known to indians that produces a yellow color.

Lastly, the site has not been protected properly by the Park Service and vandalism has started to occur. Partially this is because it is in such a remote location of the Grand Canyon and is thereby a difficult area to protect. But as a result of this, the Park Service has not advertised the site to the public either. Gordon’s Panel has been kept a “secret” for a long time; it is time for this to change.

Gordon’s Panel is in a remote location. It is possible to hike there and back in one day from BLM land if you are in shape. If you are unsure you can find the location from the maps provided, purchase a topographical map of the area to compare against.  We do not recommend hiking in the hot summer months, as temperatures can exceed 120 degrees fahrenheit. Be sure to bring plenty of water, food, and first aid gear. If you plan on a multiple day journey, make sure you have the appropriate backcountry permits from the Grand Canyon backcountry office.

lease respect this area below is a link to a map of the location.

Gordons panel map

GPS Coordinates to Panel : 36.3646 latitude, -112.89703 longitude

GPS Coordinates to Trail Head 36.33917 latitude, -112.92705 longitude

Foot Note: This is a very strenuous hike, the trail leads one along cliff ledge’s, into extreme heat(seasonally), traversing upper and lower elevations, the roads are very 4×4 only, Have good/great tires due to the jagged rocks along the entire road, prepare for the worst… this is not for children you will be without a phone signal, and no help within 100 miles.  The trip included 8 hours of hiking strenuous hiking be prepared to relax the next day