Unmet Friend To Bill Kettler written by Phill Randall

Unmet Friend,

by Phill Randall on Wednesday, 9 January 2013 at 16:36 ·

Came from the same mold him and I,

Reckon they threw it away after that day,

Not many can say two are one of a kind,

Two were friends and uncorse words we never say,

Agree on most things we were taught,

Didn’t listen to most cause we knew,

Back then when it all ment alot,

We agree on the things that were new,

Travels we have never seen on the same line,

Seen em all I guess we can say,

But we both know the places left by time,

Been there and seen em, we left it lay,

Shook a hand of many but not ours,

Maybe past each other on some trail,

If we did, I doubt it was in any cars,

Guessen we told our storys, never told a tale,

Sat by a fire and ponder we have not,

Poured coffee in a cup yet to be seen,

Probley cured the worlds problems,

Of course in a way that isn’t so mean,

Been accused of brothers to the core,

Think alike in most cases unlike some,

One fear we don’t have is a closed door,

When one hears family mentioned with out name,

Brothers of most so we might contend,

We’ve been them, an unspoked fame,

For us we agree, brothers to each, unmet friend,,

Phill Randall,

Custer,SD.

97e52c89f837c9fd0b93941487ae4258

Thank you to my brother closer than kin Phill I will always have your back!

Published in: on January 9, 2013 at 9:55 PM  Comments Off on Unmet Friend To Bill Kettler written by Phill Randall  

Buckhorn Wash Pictograph Panel

Buckhorn Wash Pictograph Panel

The San Rafael River is the boundary-Buckhorn Wash north of the River, Cottonwood Wash to the south. The southern section, Cottonwood Wash, is a wide-open rolling high desert, with low rocky bluffs studded with distant towering buttes. This road is well maintained and is generally a safe road to drive. The Buckhorn Wash portion of this route is especially scenic, with canyon walls rising many hundreds of feet above you, Native American rock art panels, a well-preserved dinosaur track and more! There are many side roads along this route, but the navigation of this road is easy-when in doubt, stay on the main road!

Believed to be the work of the BARRIER CANYON CULTURE, the Buckhorn Wash panel is more than 2,000 years old. It predates the Fremont work found in Castle Country. The Barrier Canyon people did not have pottery. They hunted and gathered, used stone and bone tools and atlatls (spear throwers).

Distinctive features of Barrier Canyon
Rock Art

  • life-sized figures without arms or legs
  • broad shoulders, tapered trunks and bug eyes
  • dots, rays and crowns above heads
  • figures accompanied by birds, insects, snakes and dogs

How these Pictographs were made
Pictographs were painted on the surface of rock with natural pigments. Black was made from yellow ochre (a mineral found in the soil), pinyon gum and sumac. When stirred together, they form a black powder. Reds were made from red ochre and the roots of mountain mahogany. Rabbitbrush was a source of yellow. Likely binding agents were plant oils and animal fats. Petroglyphs were carved, pecked or chiseled into the rock.

Buckhorn Wash Pictograph Panel

Likely tools used in making Pictographs and petroglyphs

  • brushes made from human hair, dog hair or yucca fibers
  • flint or other stone chisel and hammers
  • hollow bird bones filled with pigment
  • fingers or mouths- paint could be blown out of the mouth and onto the rock creating a negative image often associated with handprints.

Vandalism
Paint, chalk, carvings and bullet holes have vandalized the Buckhorn Panel. The canyon’s proximity to the Old Spanish Trail and its use as a hideout for outlaws made the pictograph panel a prime target for vandals. Sadly, much of the damage is permanent and lost art cannot be repaired. However, the Buckhorn Panel was greatly improved in 1995 through an intensive restoration effort. Today vandalism of rock art is illegal and should be reported to law enforcement authorities.

The Restoration Project
As part of the 1996 Centennial Celebration citizens of Emery County initiated the restoration of the Buckhorn Panel. This project was a joint effort by citizens, the BLM, Utah and county governments. This site is one of several in the United States that has been restored by Constance Silver, an internationally known art conservator. The clean up took about six weeks at the site.

Please help preserve the panel by:

  • looking with your eyes, not your hands
  • reporting vandals to the BLM or local Sheriff

Follow This Map to locate the panels

Slickhorn Canyon Ruins, UT

Slickhorn Canyon, NV

Slickhorn Canyon
offers an alternative for those who are interested in the Anasazi Ruins of Cedar Mesa but want more solitude than Grand Gulch can offer. The ruins are not as extensive as those in Grand Gulch, but Slickhorn does have one bonus: an almost perfectly preserved kiva, with the original roof still completely intact. The BLM has even provided a replica of an Anasazi ladder to give hikers access to the subterranean room through the opening in the roof. Also, the Slickhorn ruins do not appear to have been ravaged by Richard Wetherill and the other pot hunters of the late 1800s who excavated so many of the Grand Gulch ruins. Perhaps they didn’t know about Slickhorn Canyon.
Like the Grand Gulch, Slickhorn Canyon runs in a southeasterly direction from the edge of Cedar Mesa to the San Juan River. There are a number of side canyons which join the main canyon from the east side, and it is through three of these side canyons, First Fork, Third Fork, and Trail Canyon, that most hikers find access to Slickhorn. The hike described here is a loop between First Fork and Trail Canyon.
Like the Grand Gulch, Slickhorn Canyon runs in a southeasterly direction from the edge of Cedar Mesa to the San Juan River. There are a number of side canyons which join the main canyon from the east side, and it is through three of these side canyons, First Fork, Third Fork, and Trail Canyon, that most hikers find access to Slickhorn.
The hike described here is a loop between First Fork and Trail Canyon.
From the parking area at the top of First Fork, begin by walking down the bottom of the drainage in a southwesterly direction. There are no signs and no maintained trail, but enough hikers use this route that a primitive trail is beginning to form. After a fifteen minute walk you will come to a small pouroff that you can easily get around by detouring a short distance into a shallow side canyon on the left. Another mile down canyon will bring you to a much larger pouroff that cannot be dealt with so easily.
This time you will have to climb up the south side of the canyon to a bench just below the top of the mesa that you can follow around the obstacle. Many hikers before you have taken this route, so look for the cairns they have left behind to guide you.
While you are on the bench be sure to look into the back of the short side canyon on the opposite side of First Fork, and you will see a small ruin near the top of the canyon wall. Also, take note of a large sandstone monolith that stands near the opposite side of the main canyon, about 500 yards downstream from the pour off. This monolith is approximately opposite the point where the trail again descends to the canyon floor, so be sure to watch for cairns.
The monolith will also help you find your second ruin. Look carefully at the opposite canyon wall about 200 yards downstream from the monolith and you will see a large alcove about half way up the side of the canyon wall. The ruin is in the back of this alcove. Once you reach the canyon floor, walk downstream for five or ten minutes until you see a faint trail leading up to the right. This is the way to the alcove. The ruin is not visible from the bottom, and there are very few cairns marking the assent (perhaps removed by rangers?), so it is easy to miss.
Some scrambling is necessary, but the climb is not difficult. You will certainly want to spend some time checking out this ruin because it contains an extraordinarily well preserved kiva.
The Anasazi kivas are of special interest to anthropologists who study Indian cultures of the Southwest. Every Anasazi community seems to have had one of them, and the basic architecture has endured for centuries. Kiva-like structures have been around for at least 1300 years, and they still exist today in a few modern Indian cultures.
The kiva in First Fork, though 700 years old, is almost identical to a modern Hopi kiva. Notice, for instance, the small hole in the center of the floor. Similar holes appear in the seventh century pithouse kivas of Mesa Verde, as well as in present-day Hopi kivas. The Hopis, who call the hole a sipapu, or spirit hole, believe it is an entrance to the underworld. They believe that their ancestors entered and exited our world through a sipapu.
Below the kiva ruin the trail becomes much less rocky, and after 1.6 miles it opens up into a large, sandy meadow where it meets a large canyon coming in from the left (Second Fork). There are two other ruins near the canyon floor at this confluence. The one on the west side of the canyon, a small granary, is particularly well preserved. 0.4 miles further downstream will bring you to the confluence with Third Fork. If you are interested in shortening your hike you can return to the top of the mesa through Third Fork. Doing this will shorten the hike by 2.0 trail miles and 1.3 road miles.
From the confluence with Third Fork, it is 2.4 miles of easy walking to Trail Canyon. Along the way you will pass at least one other ruin site on the west side of the Slickhorn Canyon, and one other major side canyon coming in from the east. There are no signs, so be sure you turn into Trail Canyon and not the one before or after it. Just remember that Trail Canyon will be the fourth major side canyon you encounter coming into Slickhorn Canyon from the east.
About 0.6 miles up Trail Canyon there is another pour off which must be detoured. If you see the pour off you have probably missed the way, and you will have to backtrack a short distance downstream to find a faint trail that climbs about 100 feet up the south side of the canyon in order to get around the obstacle. Again, the way is marked by small cairns. As you pass above the pour off look across to the other side of the canyon at three small ruins perched precariously on a long, narrow ledge. These are the Big Ledge Ruins. Two of them look particularly interesting because they are build primarily of juniper logs rather than stone. What a chore it must have been to haul all of those logs to the high canyon ledge.
After the Big Ledge Ruins the trail again becomes very rocky as it climbs upward toward the mesa top. Occasional minor scrambling may be necessary, and if you are carrying a bulky backpack you will wish you weren’t. Finally, after two miles, the trail breaks over the top of the rim into a large flat meadow of sagebrush. Continue walking eastward across the meadow and soon you will spot the corral where your shuttle car or bicycle is parked.
Trail Statistics & Information
Activity Type:  Hiking
Nearby City: Mexican Hat
Length: 10.1 total miles
Elevation Gain: 860 feet
Trail Type: Point-to-point
Duration: 7 hours
Season: Spring, summer, fall
Trailhead Elevation: 6,080 feet
Top Elevation: 6,080 feet
Local Contacts:  San Juan Resource Area, Bureau of Land Management, in Monticello
Local Maps: Pollys Pasture (USGS), Slickhorn Canyon East (USGS)

Keyhole Canyon Petroglyphs, NV

Image Pending

Keyhole Canyon is located about halfway between Las Vegas and Searchlight, outside the town of Nelson in the Eldorado Mountains. While it is unknown who carved the petroglyphs at Keyhole Canyon, scholars do agree that the Mohave, the Paiute, and the Anasazi/Pueblo were the main groups in the region thousands of years ago.Mark Harrington, famed archaeologist of the Lost City on the Virgin and Colorado rivers, believed the Zunis (a western Pueblo tribe that may have mixed with Yuman tribes) had once called the region directly north of Las Vegas their home. With their strong mythological roots, it is possible that their beliefs influenced the people who actually carved the rocks or they made forays south of Las Vegas themselves.While overlooked as a tourist site when compared to Grapevine Canyon, Valley of Fire, and Red Rock, which are more easily accessible, Keyhole Canyon is a unique site because of the unusually large, round, geometric glyphs that cover several rock faces. These glyph symbols match up perfectly with other glyph patterns in the Southern Nevada region.The over-emphasis on geometric glyphs and the shortage of representational figures at Keyhole Canyon is an interpretive challenge. As with Grapevine Canyon, many archaeologists interpret the mysterious symbols as stemming from the Creation Mythology of the Native Americans who lived in and around the region. In this case, that would mean the Mojave, Paiute, and Anasazi/Pueblo. Creation Mythology consisted of four main evolutionary phases: early creation, the age of the god-people when spirits ruled, the rise of the animal-people when animals were men, and the conquest of the world by modern human-people.Legend says that when entering a trance state, the Indian shaman threw himself into the invisible world where all these ancestors of the modern human-people remained imprinted on the fabric of the spirit realm. Then the shaman brought back the images he had seen and re-created them on the surrounding rocks. By using this Creation Mythology as the general setting for understanding the meaning of the rock art, the following tentative explanations can be given:The Circle: The source of everything, the highest level of spirit

The Bisected Circle: When in combination with a male phallus, this is a female glyph symbolizing the separation of the human-people into man and woman. When in combination with astral glyphs, the notion of the feminine takes on a cosmic level. In Pueblo mythology, the twain worlds, or two, are created before the terrestrial world. That is, the first manifestation from the empty circle, or spirit, is dual, or the bisected circle. In Mojave, Paiute, and Pueblo mythology, the Grandmother of Many, who preceded Coyote, is one of the earliest god-people.

The Cross within the Circle: As already noted, the circle represents highest spirit. The four arms of the cross correspond to the Native American sacred number 4 or completion. For example, the number 4 consistently appears: 4 worlds or ages, 4 Old Men, 4 directions, 4 solstices/equinoxes, 4 migrations, 4 colors, 4 divisions of night, 4 sacred mountains, 4 daughters of Coyote, 4 times for Coyote to repeat an action before he is finished. In Creation Mythology, what is being completed is the evolution of the human-people. Therefore, the cross within the circle symbolizes highest spirit evolving and completing itself through the separation of the human-people into male and female.While these interpretations are tentative, the Creation Mythology approach goes beyond the previous notions of rock art as mere doodling (an unlikely thesis because the same symbols appear over thousands of miles) or as hunting magic (another unlikely thesis because the Keyhole Canyon petroglyphs do not depict big hunting scenes).

Location

Keyhole Canyon is located on BLM land between Boulder City and Searchlight.

Links to Area Map and Site Map.

From Las Vegas, drive south on Highway 93/95 towards Boulder City. Turn right onto Hwy 95 and drive south towards Searchlight for 15.5 miles to an unnamed road (Keyhole Access Road) to the left (Table 1, Waypoint 15). Keyhole Access Road is 5.8 miles south of Hwy 165 to Nelson, and 3.2 miles south of Eldorado Valley Road (the last named road). Watch for a highway sign indicating a road intersection. The road goes through the barbwire fence at a white cattle guard with a “designated roadway” sign. There are no other roads in the vicinity.                                       Lat.                     Long.

15 Hwy 93 at Keyhole Canyon access rd 35.74399 114.95439
16 Keyhole Canyon access rd at Powerline Rd 35.74327 114.91831
18 Parking Area 35.71534 114.92583
22 Powerline Rd at second Keyhole Canyon Rd 35.71685 114.92986

Note: All distances, elevations, and other facts are approximate.


Published in: on December 19, 2009 at 8:54 PM  Comments Off on Keyhole Canyon Petroglyphs, NV  
Tags: , , , , , ,

Nampaweap Petroglyphs, AZ

This is an isolated drive take it very serious, BE PREPARED
The Nampaweap Petroglyphs are etched into black basalt rock along what is believed to be a route the Anasazi and their predecessors took to travel in and out of the Grand Canyon. In Paiute, Nampaweap means “foot canyon.”
The petroglyphs are not inside the park, but they are a short jaunt off the road on the way to Tuweep.  Peck marks are visible on many of the rocks leading researchers to believe the Indians used the method known as pecking to carve the petroglyphs.
Nampaweap Petroglyphs, AZ
Before venturing into the Monument, be sure you are well prepared to deal with the rough roads and isolated conditions.

There is a great diversity of habitat types in the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, from the 2000 ft elevation hot Mohave Desert creosote bush and Joshua trees, to the Great Basin pinyon-juniper and sagebrush, to the Colorado Plateau grasslands, shrubby red rock desert, and ponderosa pine, gambel oak, and aspen communities on the 8000 ft peaks.
Containing thousands of rock art elements on hundreds of boulders along a basalt rim 1/2 mile long, Nampaweap is worth the bumpy road and the 1/2 mile walk to the site from the parking area.
Directions from St George, Utah: Take Quail Hill Road (BLM Road 1069) to Main Street Valley Road (County Road 5), drive past Mt. Trumbull to the Arkansas Ranch Road (BLM 1028), turn right and drive south about 1 mile to the signed parking area. Park and follow the trail signs to the east.
Seasonal Information:
Normally Open: Year-round .

Gordon’s Panel, also known as Shaman’s Gallery, AZ

Gordon’s Panel, also known as Shamans’ Gallery, contains the oldest prehistoric evidence of man in the Grand Canyon and is quite possibly the most important rock art panel discovered on the North American continent.

The site was used by Indian shamans to try and communicate with the supernatural for thousands of years. Did they actually see what they painted? The images are multicolored, abstract, and life sized. Underlying these figures are earlier images. Some of the smaller figures in the caves, the oldest paintings, look like neanderthal man paintings. Other paintings look like deer with huge antlers, “space men” with antennas, and objects that look like space craft. The writings here The oldest prehistoric evidence of man in the Grand Canyon and is possibly the most important rock art panel discovered on the North American continent dating back 1400 to 20,000 years.

Despite the importance of and unusual nature of this site, very little research has been done. There have been no excavations near the site to help determine who the artists could have been or how they lived. The age of the site remains estimated, as most of the paintings were done with mineral pigments that cannot be carbon dated. However, it might be possible to test for organic dyes that could be carbon dated, such as Oregon Grape, a dye well known to indians that produces a yellow color.

Lastly, the site has not been protected properly by the Park Service and vandalism has started to occur. Partially this is because it is in such a remote location of the Grand Canyon and is thereby a difficult area to protect. But as a result of this, the Park Service has not advertised the site to the public either. Gordon’s Panel has been kept a “secret” for a long time; it is time for this to change.

Gordon’s Panel is in a remote location. It is possible to hike there and back in one day from BLM land if you are in shape. If you are unsure you can find the location from the maps provided, purchase a topographical map of the area to compare against.  We do not recommend hiking in the hot summer months, as temperatures can exceed 120 degrees fahrenheit. Be sure to bring plenty of water, food, and first aid gear. If you plan on a multiple day journey, make sure you have the appropriate backcountry permits from the Grand Canyon backcountry office.

lease respect this area below is a link to a map of the location.

Gordons panel map

GPS Coordinates to Panel : 36.3646 latitude, -112.89703 longitude

GPS Coordinates to Trail Head 36.33917 latitude, -112.92705 longitude

Foot Note: This is a very strenuous hike, the trail leads one along cliff ledge’s, into extreme heat(seasonally), traversing upper and lower elevations, the roads are very 4×4 only, Have good/great tires due to the jagged rocks along the entire road, prepare for the worst… this is not for children you will be without a phone signal, and no help within 100 miles.  The trip included 8 hours of hiking strenuous hiking be prepared to relax the next day

Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon is at once one of the most breathtaking and tranquil places on earth.  Gently carved from the Navajo sandstone over the course of countless millenniums, the slot canyons are majestic and narrow passages, just enough space for a small group to walk the sandy floor – and for the occasional shafts of sunlight to shine down from above.
It is really two separate canyons – Upper and Lower Antelope.  Each contains the hidden “slots” carved from the swirling sandstone, and both drain from the south into Lake Powell (once the Colorado River).  The canyons are so narrow in places that one can stretch out his or her arms and touch both sides.
The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tse’ bighanilini, which means “the place where water runs through rocks.”  Upper Antelope is at about 4,000 feet elevation and the canyon walls rise 120 feet above the streambed.  Lower Antelope Canyon is Hasdestwazi, or “spiral rock arches.”  Both are located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.
Though dry most of the year, Antelope Canyon runs, and sometimes floods, with water after rains.  It is the water, slowly wearing away the sandstone grain by grain, that has formed the beautiful and graceful curves in the rock.  Wind has also played a role in sculpting this fantastic canyon.
You must have an authorized guide to Upper and Lower areas of Antelope Canyon. You can contact one of the outfitters below, to make reservations.
HISTORY
A long time ago, herds of pronghorn antelope roamed freely in Antelope Canyon, which explains the canyon’s English name. It is not known exactly when people first discovered Antelope Canyon. According to local Navajos, who have lived here for some time, the canyon and the LeChee area were places where cattle grazed in winter.
To older Navajos, entering a place like Antelope Canyon was like entering a cathedral.  They would probably pause before going in, to be in the right from of mind and prepare the protection and respect.  This would also allow them to leave with an uplifted feeling of what Mother Nature has to offer, and to be in harmony with something greater than themselves.  It was (and is) a spiritual experience
Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon is at once one of the most breathtaking and tranquil places on earth.  Gently carved from the Navajo sandstone over the course of countless millenniums, the slot canyons are majestic and narrow passages, just enough space for a small group to walk the sandy floor – and for the occasional shafts of sunlight to shine down from above.

It is really two separate canyons – Upper and Lower Antelope.  Each contains the hidden “slots” carved from the swirling sandstone, and both drain from the south into Lake Powell (once the Colorado River).  The canyons are so narrow in places that one can stretch out his or her arms and touch both sides.

The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tse’ bighanilini, which means “the place where water runs through rocks.”  Upper Antelope is at about 4,000 feet elevation and the canyon walls rise 120 feet above the streambed.  Lower Antelope Canyon is Hasdestwazi, or “spiral rock arches.”  Both are located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.

Though dry most of the year, Antelope Canyon runs, and sometimes floods, with water after rains.  It is the water, slowly wearing away the sandstone grain by grain, that has formed the beautiful and graceful curves in the rock.  Wind has also played a role in sculpting this fantastic canyon.

You must have an authorized guide to Upper and Lower areas of Antelope Canyon. You can contact one of the outfitters below, to make reservations.

HISTORY

A long time ago, herds of pronghorn antelope roamed freely in Antelope Canyon, which explains the canyon’s English name. It is not known exactly when people first discovered Antelope Canyon. According to local Navajos, who have lived here for some time, the canyon and the LeChee area were places where cattle grazed in winter.

To older Navajos, entering a place like Antelope Canyon was like entering a cathedral.  They would probably pause before going in, to be in the right from of mind and prepare the protection and respect.  This would also allow them to leave with an uplifted feeling of what Mother Nature has to offer, and to be in harmony with something greater than themselves.

Published in: on September 28, 2009 at 7:00 PM  Comments Off on Antelope Canyon  
Tags: , , ,

Sedona, AZ

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

There is a specialized New Age tourist industry in Sedona, where the “Harmonic Convergence” was organized by Jose Arguelles in 1987. Some purported “spiritual vortices” are said to be concentrated in the Sedona area at Bell Rock, Airport Mesa, Cathedral Rock, Boynton Canyon, and Schnebly Hill.

Native American

According to the Yavapai Native Americans, their ancestors were the first people of Sedona, descendants of “The First Lady,” daughter of the Lady of the Pearl. The Yavapai Creation Story recounts how The Lady of the Pearl was sealed in a log with the Woodpecker and sent from Montezuma Well at the beginning of a Great Flood. For days and nights to follow, it rained incessantly and flood waters rose to cover every land form on earth. After 40 days, the rain stopped, the water receded and the log finally came to rest in Sedona. The Woodpecker freed the beautiful young woman from the log and guided her to the summit of Mingus Mountain, bearing a white stone or “Pearl” her people had given her for protection on the journey. There, she met the Sun, who fell in love with her. Returning to Sedona, she bathed in an enchanted pool in Boynton Canyon. Soon afterward, she gave birth to a daughter, referred to as the “First Lady,” mother to all the Yavapai people. (Source: Spokesperson/representative of the Yavapai-Apache Nation Clarkdale, AZ.)

Sedona, AZ

Sedona, AZ

The Yavapai-Apache tribe were forcefully removed from the Verde Valley in 1876, to the San Carlos Indian Reservation, 180 miles southeast. 1500 people were marched, in midwinter, to San Carlos. Several hundred lost their lives. The survivors were interned for 25 years. About 200 Yavapai-Apache people returned to the Verde Valley in 1900.

Sedona, AZ

Sedona, AZ

Anglo-American settlement
The McDonald’s in Sedona, Arizona is the only one in the world with teal arches. They are not yellow because the city thought they would mesh poorly with the surrounding red rocks. The first color McDonalds offered was teal which the city accepted.

The first Anglo settler moved into Oak Creek Canyon in 1879. The early settlers were farmers and ranchers. Oak Creek Canyon was well-known for its apple orchards. In 1902, when the Sedona post office was established, there were 55 residents. In the mid-1950s, the first telephone directory listed 155 names. Parts of the Sedona area weren’t electrified until the 1960s.

Sedona began to develop as a tourist destination, vacation-home and retirement center in the 1950s. Most of the development seen today was constructed in the 1980s and 1990s. As of 2007, there are no large tracts of undeveloped land remaining.

Published in: on February 12, 2009 at 5:02 PM  Comments Off on Sedona, AZ  
Tags: , , , , ,