Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon is at once one of the most breathtaking and tranquil places on earth.  Gently carved from the Navajo sandstone over the course of countless millenniums, the slot canyons are majestic and narrow passages, just enough space for a small group to walk the sandy floor – and for the occasional shafts of sunlight to shine down from above.
It is really two separate canyons – Upper and Lower Antelope.  Each contains the hidden “slots” carved from the swirling sandstone, and both drain from the south into Lake Powell (once the Colorado River).  The canyons are so narrow in places that one can stretch out his or her arms and touch both sides.
The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tse’ bighanilini, which means “the place where water runs through rocks.”  Upper Antelope is at about 4,000 feet elevation and the canyon walls rise 120 feet above the streambed.  Lower Antelope Canyon is Hasdestwazi, or “spiral rock arches.”  Both are located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.
Though dry most of the year, Antelope Canyon runs, and sometimes floods, with water after rains.  It is the water, slowly wearing away the sandstone grain by grain, that has formed the beautiful and graceful curves in the rock.  Wind has also played a role in sculpting this fantastic canyon.
You must have an authorized guide to Upper and Lower areas of Antelope Canyon. You can contact one of the outfitters below, to make reservations.
HISTORY
A long time ago, herds of pronghorn antelope roamed freely in Antelope Canyon, which explains the canyon’s English name. It is not known exactly when people first discovered Antelope Canyon. According to local Navajos, who have lived here for some time, the canyon and the LeChee area were places where cattle grazed in winter.
To older Navajos, entering a place like Antelope Canyon was like entering a cathedral.  They would probably pause before going in, to be in the right from of mind and prepare the protection and respect.  This would also allow them to leave with an uplifted feeling of what Mother Nature has to offer, and to be in harmony with something greater than themselves.  It was (and is) a spiritual experience
Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon

Antelope Canyon is at once one of the most breathtaking and tranquil places on earth.  Gently carved from the Navajo sandstone over the course of countless millenniums, the slot canyons are majestic and narrow passages, just enough space for a small group to walk the sandy floor – and for the occasional shafts of sunlight to shine down from above.

It is really two separate canyons – Upper and Lower Antelope.  Each contains the hidden “slots” carved from the swirling sandstone, and both drain from the south into Lake Powell (once the Colorado River).  The canyons are so narrow in places that one can stretch out his or her arms and touch both sides.

The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tse’ bighanilini, which means “the place where water runs through rocks.”  Upper Antelope is at about 4,000 feet elevation and the canyon walls rise 120 feet above the streambed.  Lower Antelope Canyon is Hasdestwazi, or “spiral rock arches.”  Both are located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.

Though dry most of the year, Antelope Canyon runs, and sometimes floods, with water after rains.  It is the water, slowly wearing away the sandstone grain by grain, that has formed the beautiful and graceful curves in the rock.  Wind has also played a role in sculpting this fantastic canyon.

You must have an authorized guide to Upper and Lower areas of Antelope Canyon. You can contact one of the outfitters below, to make reservations.

HISTORY

A long time ago, herds of pronghorn antelope roamed freely in Antelope Canyon, which explains the canyon’s English name. It is not known exactly when people first discovered Antelope Canyon. According to local Navajos, who have lived here for some time, the canyon and the LeChee area were places where cattle grazed in winter.

To older Navajos, entering a place like Antelope Canyon was like entering a cathedral.  They would probably pause before going in, to be in the right from of mind and prepare the protection and respect.  This would also allow them to leave with an uplifted feeling of what Mother Nature has to offer, and to be in harmony with something greater than themselves.

Advertisements
Published in: on September 28, 2009 at 7:00 PM  Comments Off on Antelope Canyon  
Tags: , , ,
%d bloggers like this: