Westwater Anasazi Ruins. UT

Called Westwater Ruins, the Blanding village is under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management. It’s the largest easily accessible BLM archeological site in the Four Corners region and, like most BLM areas, is wide open to the public. No attendant holds out a hand to collect an entrance fee. No ranger patrols the area to enforce regulations. No signs declare this or that area off-limits. Federal law does prohibit damaging or removing artifacts, but otherwise you’re free to explore at will.Westwater was a typical Anasazi village with such structures as stone kivas, kilns and granaries built on ledges and in cliff-side alcoves. The residents, ancestors of modern Pueblo Indians now living in Arizona and New Mexico, farmed corn, beans and squash. They also made pottery, baskets, implements and ornaments. Although no one knows for sure why the Anasazi abandoned Westwater and their other Four Corners villages about 1300 A.D., most archeologists believe that a prolonged drought forced them to seek a more fertile homeland.
Called Westwater Ruins, the Blanding village is under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management. It’s the largest easily accessible BLM archeological site in the Four Corners region and, like most BLM areas, is wide open to the public. No attendant holds out a hand to collect an entrance fee. No ranger patrols the area to enforce regulations. No signs declare this or that area off-limits. Federal law does prohibit damaging or removing artifacts, but otherwise you’re free to explore at will.
Westwater was a typical Anasazi village with such structures as stone kivas, kilns and granaries built on ledges and in cliff-side alcoves. The residents, ancestors of modern Pueblo Indians now living in Arizona and New Mexico, farmed corn, beans and squash. They also made pottery, baskets, implements and ornaments. Although no one knows for sure why the Anasazi abandoned Westwater and their other Four Corners villages about 1300 A.D., most archeologists believe that a prolonged drought forced them to seek a more fertile homeland.
The ruins were plainly visible from County Road 232, a couple of miles off the main highway, U.S. 191. We parked our pickup, walked down a path into a gully and spent the next four hours exploring about a dozen ruins strung along the surrounding cliffs. On the roof of one kiva we could pick out a couple of faded hand-print pictographs. Here and there petroglyphs showed on rocks. Around a corner I came upon several well-worn circular depressions in a boulder where residents apparently had ground
Westwater Anasazi Ruins. UT

Westwater Anasazi Ruins. UT

Called Westwater Ruins, the Blanding village is under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management. It’s the largest easily accessible BLM archeological site in the Four Corners region and, like most BLM areas, is wide open to the public. No attendant holds out a hand to collect an entrance fee. No ranger patrols the area to enforce regulations. No signs declare this or that area off-limits. Federal law does prohibit damaging or removing artifacts, but otherwise you’re free to explore at will.Westwater was a typical Anasazi village with such structures as stone kivas, kilns and granaries built on ledges and in cliff-side alcoves. The residents, ancestors of modern Pueblo Indians now living in Arizona and New Mexico, farmed corn, beans and squash. They also made pottery, baskets, implements and ornaments. Although no one knows for sure why the Anasazi abandoned Westwater and their other Four Corners villages about 1300 A.D., most archeologists believe that a prolonged drought forced them to seek a more fertile homeland.
Called Westwater Ruins, the Blanding village is under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management. It’s the largest easily accessible BLM archeological site in the Four Corners region and, like most BLM areas, is wide open to the public. No attendant holds out a hand to collect an entrance fee. No ranger patrols the area to enforce regulations. No signs declare this or that area off-limits. Federal law does prohibit damaging or removing artifacts, but otherwise you’re free to explore at will.
Westwater Anasazi Ruins. UT

Westwater Anasazi Ruins. UT

Westwater was a typical Anasazi village with such structures as stone kivas, kilns and granaries built on ledges and in cliff-side alcoves. The residents, ancestors of modern Pueblo Indians now living in Arizona and New Mexico, farmed corn, beans and squash. They also made pottery, baskets, implements and ornaments. Although no one knows for sure why the Anasazi abandoned Westwater and their other Four Corners villages about 1300 A.D., most archeologists believe that a prolonged drought forced them to seek a more fertile homeland.
The ruins were plainly visible from County Road 232, a couple of miles off the main highway, U.S. 191. We parked our pickup, walked down a path into a gully and spent the next four hours exploring about a dozen ruins strung along the surrounding cliffs. On the roof of one kiva we could pick out a couple of faded hand-print pictographs. Here and there petroglyphs showed on rocks. Around a corner I came upon several well-worn circular depressions in a boulder where residents apparently had ground
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