Capitol Reef National Park, Petroglyph Pullout – UT

THE PETROGLYPH PULLOUT WALK
After a leisurely tour of the museum displays in the Visitor Center, take a walk along the “Petroglyph Pullout” on Utah Hwy 24, 1 1/2 miles east of the Visitor Center. Petroglyphs and pictographs, the so-called “rock art” of prehistoric peoples, have long held a special fascination for young and old alike. From the parking area, a short path leads to the base of the Wingate Sandstone cliff. Visible from this viewpoint are some of the most interesting petroglyph panels at Capitol Reef (see photo above).
Please DO NOT attempt to climb the talus slope in front of you. Use a telephoto lens for close-up photographs. Rock art panels are very fragile and many have already been seriously damaged through vandalism, carelessness, or ignorance. DO NOT TOUCH ANY PETROGLYPHS OR PICTOGRAPHS. Each touch removes a few more sand grains from the rock surface. We need your cooperation to protect and preserve these treasures of the past.
The pathway that leads to the east parallels the base of the cliff for about 500 feet and provides an opportunity for easy viewing of additional examples of Fremont rock art.
The path is uneven and narrow in places and may become slippery when wet. There are shady places along the way so the walk is not unpleasant even at midday. Many of the petroglyps visible from the path are badly weathered and difficult to spot, especially in certain lighting. There is no best time of day or year for viewing – lighting conditions change from hour to hour and sometimes from minute to minute, depending on the play of sunshine and shadow on the cliff face. Take your time, walk a short distance, stop and explore the sheer Wingate Sandstone cliff with your eyes. Then, go a bit further and repeat the process. The excitement and thrill of discovering a petroglyph panel for yourself is a major part of the enjoyment of petroglyph watching and will be a rich reward for your patience and effort.
About 500 feet down the path are the last petroglyphs along this section of the cliff: a large beautifully done image of a bighorn sheep and, on a large detached slab, the head and shoulders of a nearly life-size human figure. From this point, you can retrace your route, taking the left-hand fork in the path just before you reach the irrigation ditch crossing. This will bring you back to the parking area.
THE PETROGLYPH PULLOUT WALK

THE PETROGLYPH PULLOUT WALK

After a leisurely tour of the museum displays in the Visitor Center, take a walk along the “Petroglyph Pullout” on Utah Hwy 24, 1 1/2 miles east of the Visitor Center. Petroglyphs and pictographs, the so-called “rock art” of prehistoric peoples, have long held a special fascination for young and old alike. From the parking area, a short path leads to the base of the Wingate Sandstone cliff. Visible from this viewpoint are some of the most interesting petroglyph panels at Capitol Reef (see photo above).

Please DO NOT attempt to climb the talus slope in front of you. Use a telephoto lens for close-up photographs. Rock art panels are very fragile and many have already been seriously damaged through vandalism, carelessness, or ignorance. DO NOT TOUCH ANY PETROGLYPHS OR PICTOGRAPHS. Each touch removes a few more sand grains from the rock surface. We need your cooperation to protect and preserve these treasures of the past.

The pathway that leads to the east parallels the base of the cliff for about 500 feet and provides an opportunity for easy viewing of additional examples of Fremont rock art.

THE PETROGLYPH PULLOUT WALK

THE PETROGLYPH PULLOUT WALK

There are shady places along the way so the walk is not unpleasant even at midday. Many of the petroglyps visible from the path are badly weathered and difficult to spot, especially in certain lighting. There is no best time of day or year for viewing – lighting conditions change from hour to hour and sometimes from minute to minute, depending on the play of sunshine and shadow on the cliff face. Take your time, walk a short distance, stop and explore the sheer Wingate Sandstone cliff with your eyes. Then, go a bit further and repeat the process. The excitement and thrill of discovering a petroglyph panel for yourself is a major part of the enjoyment of petroglyph watching and will be a rich reward for your patience and effort.

About 500 feet down the path are the last petroglyphs along this section of the cliff: a large beautifully done image of a bighorn sheep and, on a large detached slab, the head and shoulders of a nearly life-size human figure. From this point, you can retrace your route, taking the left-hand fork in the path just before you reach the irrigation ditch crossing. This will bring you back to the parking area.

Advertisements
Published in: on July 13, 2009 at 4:03 PM  Comments Off on Capitol Reef National Park, Petroglyph Pullout – UT  
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: