Pinto Ghost Town, UT

Pinto Ghost Town

Pinto Ghost Town

Pinto is now considered a ghost town although there are a few year-round residents and many others that keep semi-permanent homes there.

The first settlers on Pinto Creek located where Pinto now is, according to advice from President George A. Smith. The settlers built their houses close together in fort style, making two rows of houses. They had no trouble with the Paiute Indians, but the Navajo Indians, about 1886, stole some stock from the range. The main street of the town follows the general course of the valley from southeast to northwest. The first meeting house at Pinto consisted of a small log house about 15 x 16 feet, built about 1860. A rock meeting house 24 x 34, was built in 1866 and was for many years also used as a schoolhouse.

In 1865 a treaty was made with the Paiute Indians by Colonel O.H. Iries at Pinto on September 18, 1865.

Pinto Ghost Town

Pinto Ghost Town

In 1868 the Union Iron Company commenced operations at Little Pinto bringing more settlers to the area. James G. Bleak who was traveling through the area with Erastus Snow and others said of their stop at Pinto on July 22, 1868, “…At this settlement there were nineteen families. It was a thriving place, built in fort style. Richard S. Robinson was Bishop at this time. Pinto continued as a small thriving farming community until 1916. At that time some residents who needed more land and water than Pinto offered bought and homesteaded the land at the mouth of Pinto canyon on the edge of the Escalante desert. They began to farm in the area and vacated the Pinto settlement to found the new town of Newcastle.

Another Ghost Town Located Nearby is Little Pinto

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Published in: on March 23, 2009 at 1:41 PM  Comments Off on Pinto Ghost Town, UT  
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