Range Creek Canyon, UT

Range Creek Canyon, Utah, described as one of the most intact sites of its kind anywhere in the Western US, partly due to its remote location, as well as having been closed to the public for 75 years after its modern-day discovery.
This area was populated by the Fremont Indians from about 300 A.D. for a thousand years, until the culture apparently vanished, along with that of the neighbouring Anasazi, who occupied territories to the south-east. Although this sudden collapse has yet to be fully explained, it’s thought that drought and conflict probably played a part in the final destruction of what had been a very advanced culture. Not only were the Fremont very skilled farmers, growing maize, beans and squash in a climate and environment that would have been challenging to say the least.
About a thousand years ago, the Fremont began building granaries that were frequently placed high on cliffs or other places difficult to access, with current theory positing that this was a defensive measure against marauding humans seeking to gain extra food in times of shortage, though whether there were other issues of inter-communal strife, such as claims for territory or resources isn’t yet known – archaeologists are hoping that the vast amount of intact sites around Range Creek will give them an unprecedented insight into Fremont culture and the reasons behind its ultimate demise, around 1300-1350 A.D. Here’s brief excerpt from a recent edition of Science…
“Range Creek is like finding a new library vault full of information,” says Kevin Jones, Utah’s state archaeologist and a member of the Range Creek research team. “Those books are going to be extraordinarily telling and valuable.”
Indeed, Metcalfe and others believe that Range Creek’s secrets may ultimately reveal information beyond the Fremont culture itself. The Fremont’s sudden collapse 700 years ago parallels that of other long-standing Southwestern cultures, including the Anasazi, the Fremont’s cliff-dwelling neighbors in the Four Corners region.
Experts consider the Southwest in the 1200s to have been extremely tumultuous but are split over which was the greater destabilizing force: a downturn in the environment that made farming untenable or a fracture in the social order. Whatever the trigger, fear and violence seem to have spread like wildfire throughout the region in the 13th century.
At Mesa Verde in Colorado, for example, the Anasazi sought shelter high in the cliffs and left abundant evidence of gruesome violence and cannibalism (Science, 8 September 2000, p. 1663)
The Fremont are also famous for their prodigious output of rock art, as enigmatic as it is pleasing on the eye, whilst they also produced sophisticated pottery and assorted clay artefacts, and it is likely that as further research is undertaken, even more will come to light.
The future for the area of Range Creek Canyon is uncertain – although this is undoubtedly a remarkable series of sites, the very fact that it is now much more open to the public means that damage and looting are sure to follow, as has been the case at numerous other sites in the Four Corners region, and it is to be hoped that sufficient funding is made available in order that the area may be given the proper care and protection it so richly deserves.
The ideal outcome for those working there at present is that Range Creek could become a unique open air museum, which would indeed make it one of the premier sites in that part of the world, but whether we, the general public, are up to the task of helping to preserve and respect the site, seems at present to be unlikely.
CAMPING: Designated campsites within the canyon are in the works, but for now it’s prohibited. For overnight forays, pitch your tent outside the North Gate.
WATER: Some hikers filter water from Range Creek, but pack in your own (one gallon per person per day). This creek is downstream from cattle country.
SEASON: Spring and fall, with highs in the 60s and chilly nights, are primo.
PERMITS: Required ($5 per person per day) and only available at Utah’s Division of Wildlife Resources website (wildlife.utah.gov/range_creek).
TO TRAILHEAD: From Salt Lake City, take 1-15 south for 47 miles. Merge onto US 6 toward Price/Manti. Drive 83 miles to UT 123, turn east and cruise another 8.5 miles until you reach an intersection. Go straight toward the brick buildings of the Horse Canyon Mine. Turn left at the Range Creek sign one mile past the mine buildings. Turn left and continue 8.9 miles on the unpaved winding road until you reach the North Gate camping area and the trailhead. Four wheel drive is recommended.

Range Creek Canyon, Utah, described as one of the most intact sites of its kind anywhere in the Western US, partly due to its remote location, as well as having been closed to the public for 75 years after its modern-day discovery.

This area was populated by the Fremont Indians from about 300 A.D. for a thousand years, until the culture apparently vanished, along with that of the neighbouring Anasazi, who occupied territories to the south-east. Although this sudden collapse has yet to be fully explained, it’s thought that drought and conflict probably played a part in the final destruction of what had been a very advanced culture. Not only were the Fremont very skilled farmers, growing maize, beans and squash in a climate and environment that would have been challenging to say the least.

About a thousand years ago, the Fremont began building granaries that were frequently placed high on cliffs or other places difficult to access, with current theory positing that this was a defensive measure against marauding humans seeking to gain extra food in times of shortage, though whether there were other issues of inter-communal strife, such as claims for territory or resources isn’t yet known – archaeologists are hoping that the vast amount of intact sites around Range Creek will give them an unprecedented insight into Fremont culture and the reasons behind its ultimate demise, around 1300-1350 A.D.

Here’s brief excerpt from a recent edition of Science…

“Range Creek is like finding a new library vault full of information,” says Kevin Jones, Utah’s state archaeologist and a member of the Range Creek research team. “Those books are going to be extraordinarily telling and valuable.”

Indeed, Metcalfe and others believe that Range Creek’s secrets may ultimately reveal information beyond the Fremont culture itself. The Fremont’s sudden collapse 700 years ago parallels that of other long-standing Southwestern cultures, including the Anasazi, the Fremont’s cliff-dwelling neighbors in the Four Corners region.

Experts consider the Southwest in the 1200s to have been extremely tumultuous but are split over which was the greater destabilizing force: a downturn in the environment that made farming untenable or a fracture in the social order. Whatever the trigger, fear and violence seem to have spread like wildfire throughout the region in the 13th century.

At Mesa Verde in Colorado, for example, the Anasazi sought shelter high in the cliffs and left abundant evidence of gruesome violence and cannibalism (Science, 8 September 2000, p. 1663)

The Fremont are also famous for their prodigious output of rock art, as enigmatic as it is pleasing on the eye, whilst they also produced sophisticated pottery and assorted clay artefacts, and it is likely that as further research is undertaken, even more will come to light.

The future for the area of Range Creek Canyon is uncertain – although this is undoubtedly a remarkable series of sites, the very fact that it is now much more open to the public means that damage and looting are sure to follow, as has been the case at numerous other sites in the Four Corners region, and it is to be hoped that sufficient funding is made available in order that the area may be given the proper care and protection it so richly deserves.

The ideal outcome for those working there at present is that Range Creek could become a unique open air museum, which would indeed make it one of the premier sites in that part of the world, but whether we, the general public, are up to the task of helping to preserve and respect the site, seems at present to be unlikely.

CAMPING: Designated campsites within the canyon are in the works, but for now it’s prohibited. For overnight forays, pitch your tent outside the North Gate.

WATER: Some hikers filter water from Range Creek, but pack in your own (one gallon per person per day). This creek is downstream from cattle country.

SEASON: Spring and fall, with highs in the 60s and chilly nights, are primo.

PERMITS: Required ($5 per person per day) and only available at Utah’s Division of Wildlife Resources website (wildlife.utah.gov/range_creek).

TO TRAILHEAD: From Salt Lake City, take 1-15 south for 47 miles. Merge onto US 6 toward Price/Manti. Drive 83 miles to UT 123, turn east and cruise another 8.5 miles until you reach an intersection. Go straight toward the brick buildings of the Horse Canyon Mine. Turn left at the Range Creek sign one mile past the mine buildings. Turn left and continue 8.9 miles on the unpaved winding road until you reach the North Gate camping area and the trailhead. Four wheel drive is recommended.

Gordon’s Panel, also known as Shaman’s Gallery, AZ

Gordon’s Panel, also known as Shamans’ Gallery, contains the oldest prehistoric evidence of man in the Grand Canyon and is quite possibly the most important rock art panel discovered on the North American continent.

The site was used by Indian shamans to try and communicate with the supernatural for thousands of years. Did they actually see what they painted? The images are multicolored, abstract, and life sized. Underlying these figures are earlier images. Some of the smaller figures in the caves, the oldest paintings, look like neanderthal man paintings. Other paintings look like deer with huge antlers, “space men” with antennas, and objects that look like space craft. The writings here The oldest prehistoric evidence of man in the Grand Canyon and is possibly the most important rock art panel discovered on the North American continent dating back 1400 to 20,000 years.

Despite the importance of and unusual nature of this site, very little research has been done. There have been no excavations near the site to help determine who the artists could have been or how they lived. The age of the site remains estimated, as most of the paintings were done with mineral pigments that cannot be carbon dated. However, it might be possible to test for organic dyes that could be carbon dated, such as Oregon Grape, a dye well known to indians that produces a yellow color.

Lastly, the site has not been protected properly by the Park Service and vandalism has started to occur. Partially this is because it is in such a remote location of the Grand Canyon and is thereby a difficult area to protect. But as a result of this, the Park Service has not advertised the site to the public either. Gordon’s Panel has been kept a “secret” for a long time; it is time for this to change.

Gordon’s Panel is in a remote location. It is possible to hike there and back in one day from BLM land if you are in shape. If you are unsure you can find the location from the maps provided, purchase a topographical map of the area to compare against.  We do not recommend hiking in the hot summer months, as temperatures can exceed 120 degrees fahrenheit. Be sure to bring plenty of water, food, and first aid gear. If you plan on a multiple day journey, make sure you have the appropriate backcountry permits from the Grand Canyon backcountry office.

lease respect this area below is a link to a map of the location.

Gordons panel map

GPS Coordinates to Panel : 36.3646 latitude, -112.89703 longitude

GPS Coordinates to Trail Head 36.33917 latitude, -112.92705 longitude

Foot Note: This is a very strenuous hike, the trail leads one along cliff ledge’s, into extreme heat(seasonally), traversing upper and lower elevations, the roads are very 4×4 only, Have good/great tires due to the jagged rocks along the entire road, prepare for the worst… this is not for children you will be without a phone signal, and no help within 100 miles.  The trip included 8 hours of hiking strenuous hiking be prepared to relax the next day

Best Friends Animal Sanctuary & Angel’s Rest Cemetary, UT

Angel Canyon, Kanab, UT

Angel Canyon, Kanab, UT

Angel Canyon

Millions of years ago, Angel Canyon was a shallow sea, home to dinosaurs at the beginning of the Jurassic Era. (You might see some 3-toed dino footprints during your walks in Angel Canyon.) The earliest humans came to Angel Canyon about 11,000 years ago.

Seven locations in the canyon are noted for their beauty and the atmosphere of peace and healing that emanates from them. The first is Petroglyph Rock.

The figures on the wall of Petroglyph Rock were carved about a thousand years ago by people known as the Anasazi or Hisatzanome.

Nobody has completely deciphered the meaning of all the petroglyphs (carvings) and pictographs (paintings) of the Anasazi. But they share a unique characteristic when compared to the rock art of almost every other ancient civilization of the world. Nowhere, among all the pictures and carvings, will you ever see a depiction of war, violence, slavery, subjugation, or any other form of aggression.

On the popular TV show, the Lone Ranger and Tonto took refuge in Angels Landing, a huge dome-shaped cave of red sandstone at the heart of Angel Canyon.

But long before the Lone Ranger or, indeed, any other European settlers came here, Angels Landing had been a sacred gathering place for thousands of years. Nearby, you can see evidence of people who settled here more than 10,000 years ago.

Underground Lake

A short path at the top of the pasture leads down sharply to a cave full of dark, still, chilly water that quickly curves around and goes out of sight. Bats nest in the cracks of the rock over the lake during the day, then swarm out at sundown.

Angel's Rest Pet Cemetary

Angel's Rest Pet Cemetary

Angel’s Rest

The entrance gate depicts a dog and cat with rabbits perched on their backs, surrounded by flowers in bloom. Colorful rocks form walls that hold urns, vases, and memorials. Stones and markers proclaim, “Always in our hearts,” “The best wee cat in the whole wide world,” and other loving sentiments.

Animal statues dot the landscape – a napping cat, a smiling sheepdog, an elegant owl, and many others

Anasazi Kiva

a kiva, a small circular building, built partially underground, in one of the caves that was home to a community of the Anasazi people.

The kiva was the heart of the community – most likely a ceremonial room where the people would gather on special days for prayer or purification.

Handprint Cave

Faint petroglyphs (carvings in the stone) and pictographs (paintings) decorate the walls of this cave home. The paint is red and yellow, colors that were painstakingly distilled from the iron oxide that gives the cliffs those same colors.

But your attention is immediately, almost hypnotically, drawn to the handprints.

They’re quite small. Perhaps the hands of a young person, although the adults were not large people and the prints have been carefully placed on the walls with no smudges.

Dinosaur Traces

Near the caves, millions of years earlier, a family of dinosaurs walked by and left their huge, three-toed footprints in the red sand one rainy day. The sand dried and the prints remained.

From Kanab

The entrance to Best Friends is about five miles north of Kanab on the east (right) side of Hwy 89. Between the 69 and 70 mile markers, a green highway sign indicates Kanab Canyon. Turn into Kanab Canyon and drive about 1.5 miles to the Welcome Center, which is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. seven days a week.

Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park

Capitol Reef National Park

Capitol Reef National Park is characterized by sandstone formations, cliffs and canyons, and a 100-mile long bulge in the earth’s crust called the Waterpocket Fold. Erosion has carved the rock into marvelous shapes. This is an inviting wilderness of rock with descriptive names such as Capitol Dome, Hickman Bridge, Grand Wash and Cathedral Valley.

Capitol Reef National Park

Capitol Reef National Park

Designated a national monument in 1937 and a national park in 1971, the majesty of Capitol Reef has been intriguing visitors with its twisting canyons, massive domes, monoliths and spires of sandstone for the past century. From deep narrow gorges to a bird’s eye view on the top of a peak, Capitol Reef National Park offers an assortment of activities to visitors.

Capitol Reef National Park, HC-70, Box 15, Torrey 84775, 435-425-3791

Delicate Arch Trail, UT

Delicate Arch Hike
Overview
Delicate Arch is very picturesque – it has become a Utah icon and it is perhaps the world’s most famous arch. You can see it in the distance by taking a short stroll from the Delicate Arch Viewpoint parking area, but the best way to see this natural wonder is to hike right up under it. The hike makes a wonderful little adventure suitable for all ages.
Location: East/central area in Arches National Park
Difficulty: Moderate
Length: 3 miles (round trip)
Elevation gain: 480 feet
Weather: This trail can be hiked year-round. Mid-summer afternoons can be very hot but hiking is usually pleasant in on summer mornings and in the evening. Hiking after dark would be dangerous here. Spring and fall are perfect seasons. Winter days are often mild and pleasant, but some winter days will be downright cold so watch the weather forecasts.
Other Factors: Pit toilets are available at the trailhead. Drinking water is not available so carry some with you, in your vehicle and while hiking.
Route Descriptions: The trailhead is at Wolfe Ranch, accessible via a paved spur from the main park loop road. Signs make it easy to find. The parking lot is usually full during tourist season and so you may have to park along the access road.
At Wolfe Ranch there is a panel of Native American rock art, attributed to the Utes, which is worth gazing at for a few minutes. A signed spur trail leads to it.
The trail slopes gradually upward as you hike toward the arch. The total elevation gain is only 480 feet, but it seems steeper than that as you climb up the slickrock ridge. There is no shade on that section and so the most pleasant hiking is during morning and evening hours. Midday hikes can be very hot during summer. You will want to wear a hat, use sunscreen and carry water regardless of the season.
Steps have been carved into the sandstone to make it easy to get up some steep places. In one spot the trail follows a shelf on the side a solid-rock mountain, a sheer cliff falling off one side. The trail is wide and smooth, and walking is easy, but some people get nervous because of the cliff. Just hang onto your kids and stay away from the edge.
Delicate Arch Trail, UT

Delicate Arch Trail, UT

Overview
Delicate Arch is very picturesque – it has become a Utah icon and it is perhaps the world’s most famous arch. You can see it in the distance by taking a short stroll from the Delicate Arch Viewpoint parking area, but the best way to see this natural wonder is to hike right up under it. The hike makes a wonderful little adventure suitable for all ages.
Location: East/central area in Arches National Park
Difficulty: Moderate
Length: 3 miles (round trip)
Elevation gain: 480 feet
Weather: This trail can be hiked year-round. Mid-summer afternoons can be very hot but hiking is usually pleasant in on summer mornings and in the evening. Hiking after dark would be dangerous here. Spring and fall are perfect seasons. Winter days are often mild and pleasant, but some winter days will be downright cold so watch the weather forecasts.
Other Factors: Pit toilets are available at the trailhead. Drinking water is not available so carry some with you, in your vehicle and while hiking.
Route Descriptions: The trailhead is at Wolfe Ranch, accessible via a paved spur from the main park loop road. Signs make it easy to find. The parking lot is usually full during tourist season and so you may have to park along the access road.
Wolfe Ranch Petroglyph Trail

Wolfe Ranch Petroglyph Trail

At Wolfe Ranch there is a panel of Native American rock art, attributed to the Utes, which is worth gazing at for a few minutes. A signed spur trail leads to it.
The trail slopes gradually upward as you hike toward the arch. The total elevation gain is only 480 feet, but it seems steeper than that as you climb up the slickrock ridge. There is no shade on that section and so the most pleasant hiking is during morning and evening hours. Midday hikes can be very hot during summer. You will want to wear a hat, use sunscreen and carry water regardless of the season.
Steps have been carved into the sandstone to make it easy to get up some steep places. In one spot the trail follows a shelf on the side a solid-rock mountain, a sheer cliff falling off one side. The trail is wide and smooth, and walking is easy, but some people get nervous because of the cliff. Just hang onto your kids and stay away from the edge.

Huntsman Cabin Ruins, NV

TThis is the 1903 photo of the Huntsman Cabin courtesy of Robin Adair. Robin is the family member that lead me to find the Kane Springs Ranch. David and Emeline Huntsman lived in Hebron Utah in 1871 where they had thier first son James. In 1875 they again moved, this time to Gunlock Utah. They lived in Gunlock till 1878 when they ventured over to Nevada, first at Bunkerville and then in 1881 to St. Thomas.
Here and below is my 2006 photos of the Huntsman Cabin. It was in 1891 when the Huntsman family left St. Thomas and homesteaded a 160 acre ranch they called the Kane Springs Ranch on the Meadow Valley Wash above Moapa. The large part of the rock behind the cabin that is missing, fell and covered the spring.
When the railroad came through in 1905 to Caliente the Huntsman ranch began to be a regular stop. Emeline Huntsman was well known for her cooking as well as medicine for those in need. The locals come to call her the lantern lady. When the first flood hit the wash, it was Emeline who rode up the wash looking for those who were injured and is credited for saving many lives.
During the disastrous flood of 1910, again it was Emeline who by now was not in her youth but still came to help those in need again. This time she rode up the wash to Elgin and delivered the baby of the stranded station master’s wife. Even after her husband pasted away in 1905 she remained at the ranch. She said the railroad men will take care of me, and they did.
Here is three grave located close to the house. It was told to me that two of them were bad outlaws and the third was a railroad worker. One of the legends told me was that Emeline once met Butch Cassidy on her way to get supplies at Moapa. If there was ever a woman to stand out among men, it would have to be Emeline Huntsman.
Although the springs here probably help to draw the family to settle and build a ranch, but at one time in history it drew others as well. All over the rock walls behind the cabin is a large number of petroglyphs. Here is one just north of the cabin. There are way to many to show in photos here. Click here for more Petroglyphs !
Both Emeline and her husband are buried at the Overton Cemetery . This is their stone.
This is the 1903 photo of the Huntsman Cabin

This is the 1903 photo of the Huntsman Cabin

This is the 1903 photo of the Huntsman Cabin . David and Emeline Huntsman lived in Hebron Utah in 1871 where they had thier first son James. In 1875 they again moved, this time to Gunlock Utah. They lived in Gunlock till 1878 when they ventured over to Nevada, first at Bunkerville and then in 1881 to St. Thomas.

Here and below is my 2009 image of the Huntsman Cabin. It was in 1891 when the Huntsman family left St. Thomas and homesteaded a 160 acre ranch they called the Kane Springs Ranch on the Meadow Valley Wash above Moapa. The large part of the rock behind the cabin that is missing, fell and covered the spring.

Kane Springs Ranch 2009

Kane Springs Ranch 2009

When the railroad came through in 1905 to Caliente the Huntsman ranch began to be a regular stop. Emeline Huntsman was well known for her cooking as well as medicine for those in need. The locals come to call her the lantern lady. When the first flood hit the wash, it was Emeline who rode up the wash looking for those who were injured and is credited for saving many lives.
During the disastrous flood of 1910, again it was Emeline who by now was not in her youth but still came to help those in need again. This time she rode up the wash to Elgin and delivered the baby of the stranded station master’s wife. Even after her husband pasted away in 1905 she remained at the ranch. She said the railroad men will take care of me, and they did.
Here is three graves located close to the house. I have read that two of them weIt is noted that  Emeline once met Butch Cassidy on her way to get supplies at Moapa. If there was ever a woman to stand out among men, it would have to be Emeline Huntsman.
Although the springs here probably help to draw the family to settle and build a ranch, but at one time in history it drew others as well. All over the rock walls behind the cabin is a large number of petroglyphs.  Both Emeline and her husband are buried at the Overton Cemetery .
Directions:
If you go to Moapa, the old town site at the railroad overpass to can take the road north. It run’s along side the railroad all the way. It is 10.5 miles from the overpass. If you come to the steel bridge stop. Back up a half mile. You will see a little mound that the road go’s around before the bridge. If you look back after you pass and see a fence around three graves you are there.
Google Maps:
GPS Coordinates /Map Here
I will note it was 114 degrees the day we ventured on a 3 mile hike to this location, The Nevada desert as go intended, so prepare for it it was an inspiring place respect it for it’s history and the trials we all face in modern life, life is hard imagine it there.

Parowan Gap Dinosaur Tracks & Remains, UT

 

Parowan Gap Dinosaur Tracks & Remains, UT - Fossilized Tracks

Parowan Gap Dinosaur Tracks & Remains, UT - Fossilized Tracks

This location is next to some dinosaur (Hadrosaur) footprints left in the rock as well as bone fragments we found scattered through out the area.

You will have to look hard to find these silent remains of a distant past as they are very apparent to the common traveler passing by. I am including the following GPS coordinates:
N 37°53.826 W 112°56.972
N 37°53.839 W 112°56.979
N 37°53.835 W 112°56.992
N 37°53.824 W 112°57.004

 

Parowan Gap Dinosaur Tracks & Remains, UT - Bone Fragments

Parowan Gap Dinosaur Tracks & Remains, UT - Bone Fragments

Black Mountain Petroglyph Site, UT

Manderfiled Petroglyphs

Black Mountain Petroglyphs

Ancient Indians have lived here. Petroglyph’s, Beads, and Mummified remains have been found. It’s a good road, but a steep hike. Elevation: 6202 feet.

This is a very interesting area, with good access. Turn west from the center of Manderfield, follow your GPS and Park here, (N 38* 21.489’ W -112* 41.981’) or if you have 4X4, you can go a little further to the top of the hill, (to save walking that far). Hike the trail to the north, up the ridge to the Petroglyph’s. It’s a steep trail and rocky, but well worth the climb.

Map of location here

Bloomington Petroglyph Park, UT

Bloomington Petroglyph Park, UT

Bloomington Petroglyph Park, UT

An ancient 40-ton  burnt umber boulder anchors a neighborhood park and displays Anasazi etchings that can be found through out the area. Bloomington is a small city’s Bloomington subdivision located near Saint George, UT the meeting place of southern Utah’s Great Basin and the Mojave Desert (USA).

Bloomington Petroglyph Park, UT

Bloomington Petroglyph Park, UT

MAP: Bloomington, UT

Warner Valley, UT

Warner Valley, UT

Warner Valley, UT

Although close to St. George, you feel in the middle of nowhere when you visit Warner Valley. This is a dirt road and you may be the only one in the valley so take some extra water and tell someone where you are going in case you have trouble. an easy way to get to the valley is to go through the main street in Washington to 300 East then head south and go around several hills. When the road takes a hard right look for the signs heading to the east and the valley. It will take another 20 minutes to get to the valley sites.
Ft. Pearce
Fort Pearce is a fort that saw no action. It was constructed in 1866 to protect livestoce and to protect the springs located just below the fort. The rock walls were originally 8 feet high. There was no top on the fort and 16 port holes in the wall gave the inhabitants a good crossfire in all directions should the fort be attacked, which it never was.

Dinosaur Tracks
Two dinosaurs passed this way, one 20 feet long and weighing 8 to 10 tons while the other was probably 100 pounds and 7-10 feet tall. The tracks were discovered in January of 1982. To get to the tracks, leave Fort Pearce and get back to the graded road. Head east, when the main road takes a hard right the road to the tracks keeps going to the east.

Warner Canyon, UT

Warner Canyon, UT

Dominquez – Escalante Trail
Located 100 yards north-east of the dinosaur tracks is a marker for the Dominquez – Escalante Trail. Also, look straight north to the crest of the hill and you will see another marker. It is fun to climb to the top of the hill and view the valley from this spot. The best way to get to the top is to follow the sand dune to the east and then find the trail that goes from the bottom right to the top left of the hill.

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