Pioneer Park, UT

Pioneer Park, UT
Pioneer Park
Red Hills Parkway
St. George, UT
This 52 acre rustic community park is a rock climber’s paradise. From Dixie Rock, also known as the Sugarloaf, spectacular views of downtown, White Dome, Zion National Park and Arizona can be seen. This park has a large trellis pavilion with two barbecues and fire ring, several smaller picnic areas with tables, two with metal trellis pavilions, and a separate fire pit with an amphitheater. Numerous hiking trails provide access to a Boy Scout Cave, historical pioneer cabin location, slot canyons and a connection into the Red Cliffs Desert Reserve.
Pioneer Park, UT
Amenities
• BBQ • Picnic Tables • Covered Pavillion • Walking Path
• Parking • Reservable • Trail
Pioneer Park is tucked into the cliffs just north of downtown St. George, and at this position at it has a stunning panoramic view of the city. It is also a great spot to hike, bike, and picnic. The trails in the park are beautiful as they are surrounded by desert flora and are frequented by wildlife. Of special note, there are many short fences throughout the park that protect desert turtles from traffic on the roads near the park. St. George’s “Dixie” sign is also here.
The park is just off of Skyline Drive which serves as a bypass north of the city from Interstate 15 to SR-18.

Save 10% on RedRock Back Country Adventures

Save 10% @ RedRock Backcountry Adventures

GoldField, NV

GoldField, NVAlong Highway 95 in the eastern part of Esmeralda County is a town made famous by the Earp brothers, Wyatt and Virgil, following their famous gunfight at the OK Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. Wyatt was already in Goldfield and wrote Virgil, who was living in California at the time, to move to Goldfield where “money was following like wine.” Virgil arrived in Goldfield in the spring of 1904. Soon after arriving in Goldfield, he was hired as a deputy sheriff. Wyatt was working as a pit boss in Tex Rickard’s gambling casino. On July 8, 19 05, Goldfield suffered its first major fire when a stove exploded in a millinery shop. The town was saved when the wind shifted but not before two blocks of business houses burned to the ground. Three months later, Virgil contracted pneumonia and died. Wyatt left Nevada shortly after Virgil’s death and spent many years mining in the Whipple Mountains on the California side of the Colorado River. He died on January 13, 19 29 at the age of 80.

GoldField, NV

Founded in 1902, Goldfield boasted a population of 30,000 during its boom year of 1906 when it produced $11million in gold. The town probably has the longest bar in the history of mining towns. The bar, Tex Rickard’s Northern, was so long it required 80 tenders to serve its customers. By 1912, ore production had dropped to $5 million. Those who recognized the signs began to leave and Goldfield eventually became what it is today-a ghost town. A drive south on highway 95 from Tonopah will take you to Goldfield-one of the must see towns

GoldField, NV

While there step back in history and visit the Santa Fe Saloon – Santa Fe Saloon was built. One of Goldfield’s oldest continuously-operating businesses, the saloon continues to offer four motel rooms as well as being a popular oasis in the desert. Complete with its false front, western wood sidewalks and rough floor planking, inside sports an original Brunswick Bar, dominating the Santa Fe’s back wall.

 Santa Fe Saloon

Fort Ruby, NV

Image Pending
A History of Fort Ruby
In May 1860, Co. B of the 4th Artillery assigned to Camp Floyd, Utah, was sent to Ruby Valley to find and establish a camp base to use to protect the Overland Mail Route and its passengers and others from Indian attacks. On Sept. 4, 1861, Col. E. P. Connor organized the 3rd Regiment of California Volunteers. A year later he received orders to patrol the Central Route of the Overland Mail Company. The site chosen for Fort Ruby is on the eastern side of the southern end of the Ruby Mountains in Ruby Valley, Nevada. The Fort was situated about 2 1/2 miles southeast of the Overland Mail Station on a six square mile plot of ground. The Fort’s northern boundary was on the dividing line between what are now Elko and White Pine Counties in Nevada. The site was approximately midway if the 600 miles separating Carson City, Nevada and Salt Lake City, Utah.
Col. Edward P. Connor and seven companies of soldiers (about 600 men), 55 wagons, 2 howitzers, carriages for some of the officer’s families, 3 ambulances and the regimental band departed Camp Halleck, Stockton, California, on July 12, 1862, and began marching east. They arrived at Fort Ruby on the evening of September 1, 1862. Fort Ruby was officially established pursuant to orders # 8 dated September 4, 1862 by Col. Connor.
Soldiers immediately began to gather stone and timber from the nearby mountains to build store houses and winter quarters. Living quarters were log cabins of hand hewn logs either laid horizontally or vertically and heated by fireplaces. Stables and store houses were built of vertical logs in a stockade fashion with the posts set vertically in trenches. Corrals were constructed of adobe. A good sized pond, fed by a spring, supplied the Fort with fresh water.
The Fort Ruby Spring with several views of the remains of a stone Spring House.
Photographs taken in 1868 by Tim O’Sullivan, a member of King’s Survey party, show that at least two of the officer’s quarters were built with vertical logs, caulked with adobe, had shingled roofs, 2 brick fireplaces, and 2 double-hung windows in each building. When the Fort construction was completed, there were approximately 14 white washed log buildings comprising the Army’s quarters and several other log cabin outbuildings. In 1858, the only two original buildings remaining showed evidence of having 3″ tongue and groove wainscoting in their interiors.
One of  the two original building that still existed when they burned to the ground in 1992 from an electrical caused fire. Several structures including a kitchen, recreation area and living quarters had been added on to it by Andy Anderson.
Major P. A. Gallagher served from Oct 1862 to July 1863. Dr. R. K. Reed was the first Post Doctor and then Asst. Surgeon Kirkpatrick took over the treatment of military and civilian patients at the Fort until 1863. Dr. John W. Long served as Post Doctor from 1863 to 1866.
Lt. Col. Jeremiah. B. (P.) Moore served from April 1863 to Sept 1863 (Co. K 2nd Cav. under command of Capt. Samuel P. Smith. Lt. Col. Moore was known to flog soldiers for minor infractions or made them carry heavy sandbags in the hot sun until they collapsed from heat exhaustion as punishment. He hung two Indians at this post when they were identified as having led the Indians at the Gravelly Ford battle and left their bodies hanging to frighten the Indians and keep them in line by using the hangings as an example.
During the Goshute War of 1863, the Overland Mail and Stage Company lost 150 horses, 7 of their stations were burned to the ground and 16 of their employees were killed in Nevada and Utah. Moore stayed in Ruby Valley after mustering out of the Army.
During the summer of 1864, the two California Volunteer companies stationed at Fort Ruby were replaced by a unit of the Nevada Volunteers of Co. B. 1st Nevada Infantry. The lessening of manpower made patrolling of the Overland Route much more difficult.
Capt. G. A. Thurstin was in charge beginning in the fall of 1864 until Dec. 1865. Capt. Thurstin and Dr. John W. Long, the Post Doctor tried to cure venereal disease of some of the soldiers and some Indians by constructing stone chambers at the hot springs on the Old Myers Ranch above Franklin Lake several miles north of Fort Ruby. Patients were required to sit on the stone “pots” and absorb the steam from the hot water. These structures could still be seen in 1957.
Capt. Thurstin wrote to his superiors at Fort Douglas, UT in 1864, suggesting that the Indians were stealing to prevent starvation and it would be beneficial for the Army to gather the Indians of the area together for a conference. The Army did not respond to his idea but the Overland Mail and Stage Company stepped in and told its station keepers to provide enough emergency rations to the Indians to keep them from starving to death.
A Company of 9th U. S. Infantry was in charge from Dec 1865 to Sept. 1867. On January 1, 1867, the name of Fort Ruby was changed to Camp Ruby.
Capt. George Walker assumed command Sept. 20, 1867, immediately took a six-month long furlough, and died upon his return to the command of the Fort of apoplexy about March or April 1868.
Lt. J. T. Trout took over the command when Capt. Walker died.
Capt. Timothy Connelly was in command from 1868 to 1869. Connelly was the last commanding officer at Fort Ruby. He was found guilty and court martialed at Fort (Camp) Halleck on May 20, 1869 for embezzling company funds at Fort (Camp) Ruby.
After 1865, Indian raids became infrequent and in 1869, the Army determined that Fort Ruby was no longer necessary. On instructions of Headquarters, Department of California, San Francisco, dated July 15, 1869, Fort Ruby was ordered to be abandoned. On September 20, 1869, the men of Co. I 9th Infantry and all of their supplies were transferred from Fort Ruby to Camp Halleck some seventy miles to the north.
Most of the abandoned building at Fort Ruby were sold to nearby ranchers. Thomas Short of Cave Creek is said to have bought several of the structures and moved them off the Fort. Some of the buildings or parts of them may still be being used on ranches today.
Fort Ruby was never declared a military reservation by Executive order. In 1961, the U. S. Dept. of the Interior gave landmark status to Fort Ruby. Only two original buildings, an enlisted men’s barracks and the officer’s quarters were remaining in 1992 when they were both lost to history when they were destroyed by a fire.
Fort Ruby Cemetery
This view shows the wooden fence surrounding the two graves along side the east side of the road 1/2 mile north of the Fort on the Old Narcissi Ranch property. – Shaputis photo
Twenty-one or more interments of military men and civilians took place in the Fort Ruby Military Cemetery. This cemetery has several sources saying it was located one half mile to the north of the Fort on the Old Narcissi Ranch. Two graves are fenced and can be seen on the east side of the road near a huge spreading willow tree where a road leads into the marsh. One source states the cemetery was located 1/2 mile to the west of the fort.
One of the burials was likely that of Private or Sergeant John W. Purdy, of Carson City, Nevada, who drowned in the lake in the cave at Cave Creek while exploring the cave.
Another burial may have been that of Post Commander Capt. George Walker who assumed command Sept. 20, 1867, immediately took a six-month long furlough, and died upon his return to the command of the Fort of apoplexy about March or April 1868.
A third burial undoubtedly was that of Pvt. Thomas Conley who was fatally wounded at Egan Canyon Pony Express Station during an Indian squirmish on August 11, 1860.
An erroneous local legend persists that the three fenced graves in the Egan Canyon Cemetery are those of three soldiers killed in a Indian battle in 1860. On August 11, 1860, when the Army arrived in time to save the lives of the two Egan Station keepers from a large party of Indians, during the fight, three soldiers were wounded. According the report of Lt Stephen H. Weed (File U-44, Adjutant General’s Office, Letters Received, Records of the War Dept, National Archives, Microfilm # 567, Roll 634), the three wounded soldiers were: Corpl. John Mitchell (shot in the hip, not serious) and Pvts. Joseph Henry (shot in the neck, serious) and Thomas Conley (shot through the back – serious). On the August 12, 1860, Lt. Weed ordered eight soldiers to take the wounded soldiers back to Ft. Ruby where Pvt. Thomas Conley died from his wounds. The other two survived their injuries and obviously are not buried in the Egan Cemetery.
The Quartermaster Corps authorized removal of the military dead to the Presidio Cemetery in San Francisco, California. Sources conflict on the final disposition of the interments by saying the bodies were removed to Fort Halleck, Nevada, to Carson City, Nevada, to the Presidio Cemetery in San Francisco, or that they were never moved anywhere and are still resting within a mile of the old Fort.
Soldiers who stayed
Several Fort Ruby soldiers remained after being mustered out of the Army to settle in Ruby Valley as ranchers and farmers.  Some of these Fort Ruby soldiers were:
Col. Jeremiah P. Moore settled the present Lourinda R. Wines (Mrs. J. B.) Ranch (Buckle D Ranch) after commanding Fort Ruby in 1863.
William Meyers settled the present Lloyd Meyer Ranch
James Meyers settled the present James K. Stonier Ranch. This ranch was owned by actor Joel McCrea at one time.
John Helth settled the present Duval Ranch Company
Mickey Flynn settled the present Shantytown site  John Thompson
Fort Ruby is located in the south end of Ruby Valley in White Pine County. A plaque situated in front of the Fort Ruby site located just off the Ruby Marsh Road was dedicated on June 11, 1994 by the Lucinda Jane Saunders Chapter  E Clampus Vitus states the following information:
1862 Fort Ruby 1869 “Colonel P. Edward Conner was ordered to build and command this post in 1862. The Fort was built midway between Salt Lake City, Utah and Carson City, Nevada to protect the Overland Mail route (Pony Express) and emigrant travelers from Indian raiders. Most Army outposts of this time were built in remote areas, but this post was classified by the Army as the “Worst Post in the West.” In 1869 the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad brought an end to the Pony Express, and the need for this Fort.
Post Commander Captain Timothy (last name of Connelly omitted here) was ordered to close the Fort.  He and his men returned the “Worst Post in the West” back to the Nevada desert in 1869.”
Fort Ruby 1862 – 1869. Courtesy of Stanley W. Paher from his Nevada Ghost Towns & Mining Camps and Jerry Bowen.

Shauntie Ghost Town, UT

Shauntie Ghost Town, UT

Shauntie was a boom town during the years 1872 to 1877 . There were over 40 houses of various types, several businesses including a hotel, several saloons, a post office, two stores and a smelter. When the mines gave out so did the town.

Shauntie was a mining town west of Milford flat, based in the foothills. The town burned down twice and when the mine was abandoned and people moved..

Early in 1870 prospectors, drifting east from the boom at Pioche, Nevada, and west from the spectacular strike at the Lincoln mine in the Mineral mountains near Minersville, found silver in paying quantities in the Picachio mountains across the valley from Minersville to the west. On July 8, 1870 the Star district was organized. The silver strikes attracted much excitement in both Utah, and Eastern Nevada. By early 1871 the area was so flooded with prospectors, and so many claims were being filed that the district was divided on Nov. 11, 1871 into two districts, the North Star, and the South Star. By 1880 over 1,600 claims had been staked; and the low mountains were swarming with prospectors and mining men. The mines were grouped in five or six different areas, or canyons, each with it’s own mining camp: North Camp or Shenandoah City to the North, Foothills to the East, South Camp to the South, Elephant City or Middle Camp in the middle of the range, and West Camp and Shauntie on the West side of the Mountains.

Shauntie Ghost Town, UT

Because it was located at the only regularly running water in the area, Shauntie became the smelting center for the two districts. In 1873 the Shauntie smelter was built with two stacks. In 1874, this smelter was torn down and the larger Shumar Smelter was built, with one stack, but having a 20 ton per day capacity; and employing as many as a hundred workers hauling and smelting the ore being brought in from the Rebel, Elephant, Miner’s Dream, Burning Moscow, and other mines. During the years 1872 to 1877 Shauntie boomed. Soon Shauntie was vying with Shenandoah City as the leading town in the area. Shauntie had over 40 houses of various types, and several businesses including a hotel, several saloons, it’s own post office, and stores. In June of 1875 the smelter burned to the ground, but it was quickly rebuilt and pouring out even more bullion than before. In 1876 Shauntie, itself was destroyed by fire. This still didn’t stop Shauntie. The town was soon rebuilt and was attracting the attention of mining men from all over the west. The veins in the Star districts proved to be shallow however, and by 1877 many of them were closing as their veins pinched out. Just as depression set in and the miners and prospectors of Shauntie were wondering where to go next, News of new discovery excited the ears of the investors and miners. A fabulous new mine, the “Bonanza” had been discovered just 10 miles to the Northwest in the San Francisco Mountains. As fast as the camps of the Star districts were built, so they were abandoned. As news of the discovery reached the others in the district, they just picked up and left, flocking to the new mine which had just been re-named the “Horn Silver” hoping to find work, or profit at the new diggings. Shauntie and the other camps were left abandoned for thirty three years. In 1910 there was a small resurgence when the Burning Moscow, Cedar-Talisman, and Harrington-Hickory mines were re-opened to mine out the low grade ore that was left behind during the boom period. Shauntie again was the center of activity. The Post Office was changed to Moscow in honor of the Burning Moscow mine, then to Talisman, but the locals still just called it Shauntie. By 1920 the low grade ore was mined out, the few people that stayed to carry on small time mining moved to Milford leaving Shauntie and the other Star District camps deserted and crumbling. Over the years the townspeople and farmers around Milford dismantled and hauled off everything they could use from around the mines leaving just a few shacks and head frames at the mines. Foundations and broken glass scattered through the sagebrush and junipers area all that is left of what was once the thriving camp of Shauntie.

Map of Location

South Camp 1800s Mining Ruins, UT

South Camp 1800s Mining Ruins, UT

 

South Camp 1800s Mining Ruins – The remains of these rock cabins are some of the last vestiges of “South Camp”, one of the leading mining camps in the Star Range, which was active in the late 1800s. More than a hundred years ago this was a bustling town. With an active stagecoach line from Milford which led west through South Camp to Nevada. Homes, stores, and saloons once stood here. The mines in the area are are open yet dangerous, although some of them still hold priceless ore for those who are up for the adventure.

South Camp 1800s Mining Ruins, UT

Location For Google Map Click Here

Huntsman Cabin Ruins, NV

TThis is the 1903 photo of the Huntsman Cabin courtesy of Robin Adair. Robin is the family member that lead me to find the Kane Springs Ranch. David and Emeline Huntsman lived in Hebron Utah in 1871 where they had thier first son James. In 1875 they again moved, this time to Gunlock Utah. They lived in Gunlock till 1878 when they ventured over to Nevada, first at Bunkerville and then in 1881 to St. Thomas.
Here and below is my 2006 photos of the Huntsman Cabin. It was in 1891 when the Huntsman family left St. Thomas and homesteaded a 160 acre ranch they called the Kane Springs Ranch on the Meadow Valley Wash above Moapa. The large part of the rock behind the cabin that is missing, fell and covered the spring.
When the railroad came through in 1905 to Caliente the Huntsman ranch began to be a regular stop. Emeline Huntsman was well known for her cooking as well as medicine for those in need. The locals come to call her the lantern lady. When the first flood hit the wash, it was Emeline who rode up the wash looking for those who were injured and is credited for saving many lives.
During the disastrous flood of 1910, again it was Emeline who by now was not in her youth but still came to help those in need again. This time she rode up the wash to Elgin and delivered the baby of the stranded station master’s wife. Even after her husband pasted away in 1905 she remained at the ranch. She said the railroad men will take care of me, and they did.
Here is three grave located close to the house. It was told to me that two of them were bad outlaws and the third was a railroad worker. One of the legends told me was that Emeline once met Butch Cassidy on her way to get supplies at Moapa. If there was ever a woman to stand out among men, it would have to be Emeline Huntsman.
Although the springs here probably help to draw the family to settle and build a ranch, but at one time in history it drew others as well. All over the rock walls behind the cabin is a large number of petroglyphs. Here is one just north of the cabin. There are way to many to show in photos here. Click here for more Petroglyphs !
Both Emeline and her husband are buried at the Overton Cemetery . This is their stone.
This is the 1903 photo of the Huntsman Cabin

This is the 1903 photo of the Huntsman Cabin

This is the 1903 photo of the Huntsman Cabin . David and Emeline Huntsman lived in Hebron Utah in 1871 where they had thier first son James. In 1875 they again moved, this time to Gunlock Utah. They lived in Gunlock till 1878 when they ventured over to Nevada, first at Bunkerville and then in 1881 to St. Thomas.

Here and below is my 2009 image of the Huntsman Cabin. It was in 1891 when the Huntsman family left St. Thomas and homesteaded a 160 acre ranch they called the Kane Springs Ranch on the Meadow Valley Wash above Moapa. The large part of the rock behind the cabin that is missing, fell and covered the spring.

Kane Springs Ranch 2009

Kane Springs Ranch 2009

When the railroad came through in 1905 to Caliente the Huntsman ranch began to be a regular stop. Emeline Huntsman was well known for her cooking as well as medicine for those in need. The locals come to call her the lantern lady. When the first flood hit the wash, it was Emeline who rode up the wash looking for those who were injured and is credited for saving many lives.
During the disastrous flood of 1910, again it was Emeline who by now was not in her youth but still came to help those in need again. This time she rode up the wash to Elgin and delivered the baby of the stranded station master’s wife. Even after her husband pasted away in 1905 she remained at the ranch. She said the railroad men will take care of me, and they did.
Here is three graves located close to the house. I have read that two of them weIt is noted that  Emeline once met Butch Cassidy on her way to get supplies at Moapa. If there was ever a woman to stand out among men, it would have to be Emeline Huntsman.
Although the springs here probably help to draw the family to settle and build a ranch, but at one time in history it drew others as well. All over the rock walls behind the cabin is a large number of petroglyphs.  Both Emeline and her husband are buried at the Overton Cemetery .
Directions:
If you go to Moapa, the old town site at the railroad overpass to can take the road north. It run’s along side the railroad all the way. It is 10.5 miles from the overpass. If you come to the steel bridge stop. Back up a half mile. You will see a little mound that the road go’s around before the bridge. If you look back after you pass and see a fence around three graves you are there.
Google Maps:
GPS Coordinates /Map Here
I will note it was 114 degrees the day we ventured on a 3 mile hike to this location, The Nevada desert as go intended, so prepare for it it was an inspiring place respect it for it’s history and the trials we all face in modern life, life is hard imagine it there.

Parowan Front WMA Pioneer Ruins, UT

UDWR currently owns and manages over 6,000 acres in the Parowan Front WMA situated in the foothills east of I-15 near the town of Summit, located in Iron County, Utah.  The holdings in this particular WMA were acquired during the period 1952-1985, from a mix of private, U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Utah School & Institutional Trust Lands Administration (TLA) sources.  A primary wildlife value provided by the Parowan Front WMA is crucial winter habitat for mule deer, although it supplies winter habitat values for other wildlife species, including elk, wild turkeys, and bald eagles.

Parowan Front WMA Pioneer Ruins, Utah

Parowan Front WMA Pioneer Ruins, Utah

Queho

The mystery and legend of renegade Indian, Queho (pronounced Key-Ho), continues to be debated today as to whether he was a scoundrel or a scapegoat. Was the Southern Nevada Indian a true outlaw killer or was he merely blamed by law officers for an abundance of unsolved crimes.
Thought to have been born around 1880 at Cottonwood Island near the town of Nelson, Nevada, Queho’s Cocopah mother died shortly after giving birth. Though the identity of his father remains a mystery, various theories have been presented including a Paiute brave from a neighboring tribe, a white soldier from Fort Mohave, or a Mexican miner. Though the answer to this question will never be known, Queho was an outcast from the start due to his “shameful” mixed blood. Adding to this, the boy was born with a club foot, which further caused the local tribes to reject him.
Raised on a reservation in Las Vegas, he worked from an early age as a ranch laborer and wood gatherer in several of the nearby mining camps. Always known to be sullen, moody, and quick-tempered, it came as no surprise when he began to have troubles with the law.
Some stories, though unconfirmed, tell of him being involved in the death of another Indian in 1897, but newspaper accounts of his exploits do not begin until November, 1910. The first report tells of Queho being the main suspect in a slaying of another Indian during a brawl on the Las Vegas reservation. Allegedly, he and the other man, named Harry Bismark, were drinking when the dispute began. Queho went on the run and according to some accounts, murdered two Paiute Indians when he stole their horses in his escape.
On his flight, he stopped for supplies in Las Vegas and was confronted by a shopkeeper named Hy Von, which resulted in Queho breaking both the man’s arms and fracturing his skull with a pick handle. Fleeing south to Nelson, he took shelter in Eldorado Canyon.
Before long, word came from Searchlight that a Queho had beaten to death a woodcutter named J.M. Woodworth. According to the tale, he had beaten the man with a piece of timber after Woodworth refused to pay him after having helped him cutting timber.
Deputy Sheriff Howe formed a posse and group first went to the scene of Woodworth’s killing where they found a distinctive print left by Queho’s clubfoot. From there, they tracked the fugitive to Eldorado Canyon where they led to the Gold Bug mine. There, they found the body of the watchman, L.W. “Doc” Gilbert. Shot in the back, Gilbert’s special deputy badge No. 896, had been stolen. Continuing to track Queho to the Colorado River, they lost the trail. Though the lawmen had searched for Queho over a 200 mile area ranging from Crescent to Nipton, they found nothing but the trace footprints. Having thought that Queho would be easy to track and capture due to his clubfoot, they couldn’t have been more wrong. After some time, they finally gave up the chase.
Eldorado Canyon, Nevada area, April, 2005, David Alexander.
However, Nevada State Police Sergeant Newgard soon picked up the search along with several Indian trackers and two experienced hunters. Though they also found signs of Queho’s presence, they too finally gave up the search when they ran short of supplies. The frustrated and exhausted lawmen returned to Las Vegas empty handed in February 1911.
Over the next several years, the sightings of Queho continued and his legend began to grow. Up and down the length of the Colorado River, miners and settlers told of missing cattle, unexplained thefts, and mysterious murders. All were attributed to the phantom renegade, which served as constant source of embarrassment to the local lawmen.
In 1913, local newspapers attributed the death of a 100-year-old blind Indian known as Canyon Charlie to Queho. Allegedly, Charlie’s few provisions were gone, which included little more than food, prompting everyone to believe that Queho would kill for almost anything. However, there were others that disputed the murder as being Queho’s responsibility, as the old Indian was known to be the fugitive’s friend and confidant.
A few months later when two more miners working claims at Jenny Springs were found shot in the back and their provisions stolen, these murders, too, were blamed on the illustrious outlaw. An Indian woman found dead a short time later was also blamed on the renegade.
The hysteria continued to grow until rewards reaching $2,000 were offered for his capture, “Dead or Alive.” The Searchlight Bulletin was quick to remind its readers of the reward while screaming, “A good Indian is a dead Indian.”
Though the furor died down for several years, area settlers continued to worry anytime someone went missing for even and hour or two. Queho became the stuff of legends and the bogeyman to scare children into behaving.
In a few more years, in 1919, the murderous tales would begin again when two prospectors named William Hancock and Eather Taylor were found dead upstream from Eldorado Canyon. Both had been shot in the back and Taylor’s head had been smashed in with an ax handle.  With their supplies missing and Queho’s footprints allegedly being found at the site, he was immediately the prime suspect.
About a week later on January 21, 1919, Maude Douglas, the wife of an Eldorado Canyon miner, was awakened in the night by a commotion in the larder at the rear of the cabin. When her husband heard a shotgun blast, he found her shot in the chest and surrounded by canned goods. When authorities arrived at the cabin near the Techatticup Mine, they pronounced it to have been yet another crime committed by Queho as they allegedly found his footprints around the cabin.  Though a four-year-old boy in Maude’s care said that the woman had been killed by her husband, no one listened, immediately resuming the chase for the elusive Indian renegade once again.
The reward for Queho’s capture was increased to $3,000 and southern Nevada Sheriff Sam Gay  ordered Deputy Frank Wait to round up a posse and hire the best trackers to once and for all kill or capture Queho. Though they tracked the outlaw north to Las Vegas Wash and on into the Muddy Mountains, they soon lost his trail. Gathering up yet more men, Wait split the group into two parties who continued the search. The manhunt lasted almost two months, despite freezing rain and snow. Though they didn’t find Queho, the lawmen did find the skeletons of two miners who had disappeared several years before. Though there was no proof whatsoever, Queho took the blame for these murders as well.
As sighting of Queho continued over the next several years, Under sheriff Frank Wait would resume his search periodically in the area where Boulder Dam would later be built to as far south as Searchlight. But when no further murders were committed, interest in the elusive Indian faded.
The last time that the renegade was reportedly seen was when he was spotted by a Las Vegas policeman walking down  Fremont Street in February of 1930.  The officer immediately summoned reinforcements, but by the time they arrived, Queho was gone once again.
Posse that recovered Queho’s remains stands  at the mouth of his cave hideout. From left, Clarke Kenyon, Frank Wait, and Art Schroeder. Photo courtesy  UNLV Special Collections
As the legend was finally beginning to die, three prospectors by the names of Charles Kenyon and brothers, Art and Schroder, found the remains of a dead Indian on February 18, 1940. High in a cave on the side of Black Canyon, the mummified body was found along with a Winchester 30/30 rifle, clothing, cooking utensils, tools, and a  “special Deputy badge, No.896″.
Frank Wait, then Chief of police for Las Vegas, and original member of the posse in 1910, rushed to the scene and positively identified the remains as belonging to Queho. A few days later on February 21, 1940, he headlines in the Las Vegas Review-Journal read “Body of Indian Found.”
Queho’s remains were taken to Palm Funeral Home in Las Vegas and Charles Kenyon, who had first found the body, demanded the reward. However, when the rewards offered more than a decade earlier were ignored, Kenyon demanded that the body be turned over to him.
When he threatened to sell it to the Las Vegas Elks Club for exhibition purposes, a court order was issued to prevent him from doing so. In the meantime, several Indians came forward claiming to be Queho’s heirs. As the corpse lay in storage at the funeral home, charges were accumulating and the facility was demanding that the body be moved and the bill paid. Suddenly Kenyon and those claiming to be heirs suddenly “disappeared” and the judge ruled that the funeral home had all rights to the body. All this haggling had taken three years and the funeral home issued an ultimatum that if the body was retrieved and the charges paid, it would cremate the corpse and scatter the ashes over the desert.
Queho’s old nemesis, Frank Wait paid the bill and gave the remains and artifacts to the Las Vegas Elks Club, who produced what was then the city’s biggest public celebration, Helldorado. The club then built a glassed in case and recreated a “cave” to exhibit the body and artifacts at Helldorado Village in Las Vegas. The Indian’s remains stayed on public display until the early 1950’s and, on at least one occasion, even rode in one of the famous Las Vegas Helldorado parades.
When the Elks Club no longer wanted responsibility for Queho’s remains that passed through several private hands before landing at the Museum of Natural History at the University of Nevada , where they remained until the mid 1970′s. Finally, a retired Las Vegas attorney by the name of Ronald H. Wiley, secured the remains from the museum, and on November 6, 1975, Queho was finally laid to rest. In a small ceremony on Wiley’s Pahrum Valley ranch, the ceremony was attended by Frank Wait, who told the local press he was relieved that his old adversary had finally been given a proper burial.
During his lifetime, Queho was credited with the deaths of 23 people, was  declared as Nevada’s “Public Enemy No. 1,” and the state’s first mass murderer.  While many believe that the Indian was little more than a brutish killer, others see him as an abused man who was hounded his entire life and blamed for dozens of atrocities that he did not commit. The truth remains a mystery.
Queho's Cave Marker

Queho's Cave Marker

The mystery and legend of renegade Indian, Queho (pronounced Key-Ho), continues to be debated today as to whether he was a scoundrel or a scapegoat. Was the Southern Nevada Indian a true outlaw killer or was he merely blamed by law officers for an abundance of unsolved crimes.
Thought to have been born around 1880 at Cottonwood Island near the town of Nelson, Nevada, Queho’s Cocopah mother died shortly after giving birth. Though the identity of his father remains a mystery, various theories have been presented including a Paiute brave from a neighboring tribe, a white soldier from Fort Mohave, or a Mexican miner. Though the answer to this question will never be known, Queho was an outcast from the start due to his “shameful” mixed blood. Adding to this, the boy was born with a club foot, which further caused the local tribes to reject him.
Raised on a reservation in Las Vegas, he worked from an early age as a ranch laborer and wood gatherer in several of the nearby mining camps. Always known to be sullen, moody, and quick-tempered, it came as no surprise when he began to have troubles with the law.
Some stories, though unconfirmed, tell of him being involved in the death of another Indian in 1897, but newspaper accounts of his exploits do not begin until November, 1910. The first report tells of Queho being the main suspect in a slaying of another Indian during a brawl on the Las Vegas reservation. Allegedly, he and the other man, named Harry Bismark, were drinking when the dispute began. Queho went on the run and according to some accounts, murdered two Paiute Indians when he stole their horses in his escape.
On his flight, he stopped for supplies in Las Vegas and was confronted by a shopkeeper named Hy Von, which resulted in Queho breaking both the man’s arms and fracturing his skull with a pick handle. Fleeing south to Nelson, he took shelter in Eldorado Canyon.
Before long, word came from Searchlight that a Queho had beaten to death a woodcutter named J.M. Woodworth. According to the tale, he had beaten the man with a piece of timber after Woodworth refused to pay him after having helped him cutting timber.
Deputy Sheriff Howe formed a posse and group first went to the scene of Woodworth’s killing where they found a distinctive print left by Queho’s clubfoot. From there, they tracked the fugitive to Eldorado Canyon where they led to the Gold Bug mine. There, they found the body of the watchman, L.W. “Doc” Gilbert. Shot in the back, Gilbert’s special deputy badge No. 896, had been stolen. Continuing to track Queho to the Colorado River, they lost the trail. Though the lawmen had searched for Queho over a 200 mile area ranging from Crescent to Nipton, they found nothing but the trace footprints. Having thought that Queho would be easy to track and capture due to his clubfoot, they couldn’t have been more wrong. After some time, they finally gave up the chase.
Eldorado Canyon, Nevada area, April, 2005, David Alexander.
However, Nevada State Police Sergeant Newgard soon picked up the search along with several Indian trackers and two experienced hunters. Though they also found signs of Queho’s presence, they too finally gave up the search when they ran short of supplies. The frustrated and exhausted lawmen returned to Las Vegas empty handed in February 1911.
Over the next several years, the sightings of Queho continued and his legend began to grow. Up and down the length of the Colorado River, miners and settlers told of missing cattle, unexplained thefts, and mysterious murders. All were attributed to the phantom renegade, which served as constant source of embarrassment to the local lawmen.
In 1913, local newspapers attributed the death of a 100-year-old blind Indian known as Canyon Charlie to Queho. Allegedly, Charlie’s few provisions were gone, which included little more than food, prompting everyone to believe that Queho would kill for almost anything. However, there were others that disputed the murder as being Queho’s responsibility, as the old Indian was known to be the fugitive’s friend and confidant.
A few months later when two more miners working claims at Jenny Springs were found shot in the back and their provisions stolen, these murders, too, were blamed on the illustrious outlaw. An Indian woman found dead a short time later was also blamed on the renegade.
The hysteria continued to grow until rewards reaching $2,000 were offered for his capture, “Dead or Alive.” The Searchlight Bulletin was quick to remind its readers of the reward while screaming, “A good Indian is a dead Indian.”
Though the furor died down for several years, area settlers continued to worry anytime someone went missing for even and hour or two. Queho became the stuff of legends and the bogeyman to scare children into behaving.
In a few more years, in 1919, the murderous tales would begin again when two prospectors named William Hancock and Eather Taylor were found dead upstream from Eldorado Canyon. Both had been shot in the back and Taylor’s head had been smashed in with an ax handle.  With their supplies missing and Queho’s footprints allegedly being found at the site, he was immediately the prime suspect.
About a week later on January 21, 1919, Maude Douglas, the wife of an Eldorado Canyon miner, was awakened in the night by a commotion in the larder at the rear of the cabin. When her husband heard a shotgun blast, he found her shot in the chest and surrounded by canned goods. When authorities arrived at the cabin near the Techatticup Mine, they pronounced it to have been yet another crime committed by Queho as they allegedly found his footprints around the cabin.  Though a four-year-old boy in Maude’s care said that the woman had been killed by her husband, no one listened, immediately resuming the chase for the elusive Indian renegade once again.
The reward for Queho’s capture was increased to $3,000 and southern Nevada Sheriff Sam Gay  ordered Deputy Frank Wait to round up a posse and hire the best trackers to once and for all kill or capture Queho. Though they tracked the outlaw north to Las Vegas Wash and on into the Muddy Mountains, they soon lost his trail. Gathering up yet more men, Wait split the group into two parties who continued the search. The manhunt lasted almost two months, despite freezing rain and snow. Though they didn’t find Queho, the lawmen did find the skeletons of two miners who had disappeared several years before. Though there was no proof whatsoever, Queho took the blame for these murders as well.
As sighting of Queho continued over the next several years, Under sheriff Frank Wait would resume his search periodically in the area where Boulder Dam would later be built to as far south as Searchlight. But when no further murders were committed, interest in the elusive Indian faded.
The last time that the renegade was reportedly seen was when he was spotted by a Las Vegas policeman walking down  Fremont Street in February of 1930.  The officer immediately summoned reinforcements, but by the time they arrived, Queho was gone once again.
Posse that recovered Queho’s remains stands  at the mouth of his cave hideout. From left, Clarke Kenyon, Frank Wait, and Art Schroeder. Photo courtesy  UNLV Special Collections
As the legend was finally beginning to die, three prospectors by the names of Charles Kenyon and brothers, Art and Schroder, found the remains of a dead Indian on February 18, 1940. High in a cave on the side of Black Canyon, the mummified body was found along with a Winchester 30/30 rifle, clothing, cooking utensils, tools, and a  “special Deputy badge, No.896″.
Frank Wait, then Chief of police for Las Vegas, and original member of the posse in 1910, rushed to the scene and positively identified the remains as belonging to Queho. A few days later on February 21, 1940, he headlines in the Las Vegas Review-Journal read “Body of Indian Found.”
Queho’s remains were taken to Palm Funeral Home in Las Vegas and Charles Kenyon, who had first found the body, demanded the reward. However, when the rewards offered more than a decade earlier were ignored, Kenyon demanded that the body be turned over to him.
When he threatened to sell it to the Las Vegas Elks Club for exhibition purposes, a court order was issued to prevent him from doing so. In the meantime, several Indians came forward claiming to be Queho’s heirs. As the corpse lay in storage at the funeral home, charges were accumulating and the facility was demanding that the body be moved and the bill paid. Suddenly Kenyon and those claiming to be heirs suddenly “disappeared” and the judge ruled that the funeral home had all rights to the body. All this haggling had taken three years and the funeral home issued an ultimatum that if the body was retrieved and the charges paid, it would cremate the corpse and scatter the ashes over the desert.
Queho’s old nemesis, Frank Wait paid the bill and gave the remains and artifacts to the Las Vegas Elks Club, who produced what was then the city’s biggest public celebration, Helldorado. The club then built a glassed in case and recreated a “cave” to exhibit the body and artifacts at Helldorado Village in Las Vegas. The Indian’s remains stayed on public display until the early 1950’s and, on at least one occasion, even rode in one of the famous Las Vegas Helldorado parades.
When the Elks Club no longer wanted responsibility for Queho’s remains that passed through several private hands before landing at the Museum of Natural History at the University of Nevada , where they remained until the mid 1970′s. Finally, a retired Las Vegas attorney by the name of Ronald H. Wiley, secured the remains from the museum, and on November 6, 1975, Queho was finally laid to rest. In a small ceremony on Wiley’s Pahrum Valley ranch, the ceremony was attended by Frank Wait, who told the local press he was relieved that his old adversary had finally been given a proper burial.
During his lifetime, Queho was credited with the deaths of 23 people, was  declared as Nevada’s “Public Enemy No. 1,” and the state’s first mass murderer.  While many believe that the Indian was little more than a brutish killer, others see him as an abused man who was hounded his entire life and blamed for dozens of atrocities that he did not commit. The truth remains a mystery.

Techatticup Ghost Town, NV

Over the last decade the couple has also restored and preserved a number of buildings at the mine site. Across from the mine sits a historic 1861 building which serves as a museum to the area and to the Techatticup Mine.

One of the many buildings restored by Tony and
Bobbie Werly, that now serves as a museum,
April, 2005, Kathy Weiser.
This image available for photographic prints and downloads HERE!
Here you will see a display of old photographs, tools and other mining memorabilia. Tony and Bobbie also provide river tours and rent kayaks and canoes for use on the nearby Colorado River. Reservations for river tours are required.
The Techatticup Mine has been the set of two movies. The first, Breakdown, with Kurt Russell and Kathleen Quinlan, was released in 1997 and several artifacts from the movie can be seen at the site. Several years later, the movie 3000 Miles to Graceland, was released in 2001, parts of which were filmed at the mine site. This movie, again with Kurt Russell, as well as an all star cast including Kevin Costner, Courtney Cox, Christian Slater , and David Arquette, shot several scenes here including the scene where the Lucky Strike gas station blows up . Props from the movie, including the crashed airplane can still be seen at the site.
Beyond Techatticup, the road continues to wind its way to the Colorado River where it opens up to panoramic views across Lake Mohave into Arizona. On the river below once stood Nelson’s landing, long gone today. Numerous old roads angle down toward the lake where much of the area is administered by the National Park Service.  Be aware that severe penalties can be levied for off-roading in National Park areas.
If you travel the outlying land, be cautious as there are many open mines and ventilation shafts. Though most of the mines in the district are no longer active, the majority are on private property and are so posted. Respect these no-trespassing signs as reports have it that local land owners are quick to prosecute trespassers.
To get to Eldorado Canyon follow I-95 south of Boulder City for 13 miles to SR 165. Turn left on SR 165 (Nelson Road) for about 11 miles to Nelson. Continuing from Nelson, the Techatticup Mine is just a few more miles down the winding road, and a few miles beyond that, is Lake Mohave.
Contact Information:
Eldorado Canyon Mine Tours
Highway 165 between Nelson, Nevada and the Colorado River
702-291-0026
Techatticup Ghost Town, NV

Techatticup Ghost Town, NV

Over the last decade this ghost town has been  restored and preserved a number of buildings at the mine site. Across from the mine sits a historic 1861 building which serves as a museum to the area and to the Techatticup Mine.
One of the many buildings restored by Tony and Bobbie Werly, that now serves as a museum,  Tony and Bobbie also provide river tours and rent kayaks and canoes for use on the nearby Colorado River. Reservations for river tours are required.
The Techatticup Mine has been the set of two movies. The first, Breakdown, with Kurt Russell and Kathleen Quinlan, was released in 1997 and several artifacts from the movie can be seen at the site. Several years later, the movie 3000 Miles to Graceland, was released in 2001, parts of which were filmed at the mine site. This movie, again with Kurt Russell, as well as an all star cast including Kevin Costner, Courtney Cox, Christian Slater , and David Arquette, shot several scenes here including the scene where the Lucky Strike gas station blows up . Props from the movie, including the crashed airplane can still be seen at the site.
Beyond Techatticup, the road continues to wind its way to the Colorado River where it opens up to panoramic views across Lake Mohave into Arizona. On the river below once stood Nelson’s landing, long gone today. Numerous old roads angle down toward the lake where much of the area is administered by the National Park Service.  Be aware that severe penalties can be levied for off-roading in National Park areas.
Techatticup Ghost Town, NV

Techatticup Ghost Town, NV

If you travel the outlying land, be cautious as there are many open mines and ventilation shafts. Though most of the mines in the district are no longer active, the majority are on private property and are so posted. Respect these no-trespassing signs as reports have it that local land owners are quick to prosecute trespassers.
To get to Eldorado Canyon follow I-95 south of Boulder City for 13 miles to SR 165. Turn left on SR 165 (Nelson Road) for about 11 miles to Nelson. Continuing from Nelson, the Techatticup Mine is just a few more miles down the winding road, and a few miles beyond that, is Lake Mohave.
Techatticup Ghost Town, NV

Techatticup Ghost Town, NV

Contact Information:
Eldorado Canyon Mine Tours
Highway 165 between Nelson, Nevada and the Colorado River
702-291-0026
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.